Art Radar Asia

Contemporary art trends and news from Asia and beyond

  • Photobucket
  • About Art Radar Asia

    Art Radar Asia News conducts original research and scans global news sources to bring you selected topical stories about the taste-changing, news-making and the up and coming in Asian contemporary art.

Archive for the ‘Electronic art’ Category

ARCO Madrid 2009 international art fair news round-up – galleries drop out, public funding prop, Indian art

Posted by artradar on February 12, 2009


head_1295080i

INTERNATIONAL ART FAIRS

ARCO Madrid, one of the largest and most important international art fairs holds its 28th edition from 11 February to 16 February 2009  in a new location:  Halls 6, 8 & 10 at Feria de Madrid, Spain. 238 galleries from 32 countries are participating.

Financial downturn hits art worldBBC – 16 Feb 209 – video clip – An insubstantial very brief video story about how the crisis is affecting the art fair: some artists are using the crisis as inspiration for their art: interview with art fair director Lourdes Fernandez who says it is more difficult for some dealers this year.

Dealers reported mixed results at Spain’s monster contemporary art fair ArcoFinancial Times – 14 Feb 2009 – Georgina Adam reports that Spanish museums budgets have melted and prices of artworks have been reduced. Artists attracting interest/buyers included Georg Baselitz, Amaya Gonzalez Reyes, Eugenio Merino’s take off of Damien Hirst ‘For The Love of Gold’.

41obakg5p1l__sl125_

Click to buy

Arco Beep New Media Art Award  – We Make Money Not Art  – 13 Feb 2009 – Post written by a member of the jury about the award, the entries and the winner. The award was won by Ubermorgen.com for its EKMRZ Trilogy, a fascinating triptych about the three kings of ecommerce Google, Amazon and ebay. The Google art work ‘Google will eat itself’ involves the artists raising money with google text ads and using the money to buy Google shares.

Panorama India Artslant provides a list of artists and galleries from India, Arco’s special guest country 2009.

Tatsumi Orimoto performs Punishment at Arco 2009 video – Vernissage TV

Hirst statue stars at Madrid show as dealers aim to defy slumpBloomberg – 13 Feb 2009 – A Florida collector bought Merino’s sculpture of Hirst committing suicide “Hirst is always trying to think of ways to make his art the most expensive. If he killed himself, then the value of his art would increase a lot.” Despite India being guest country only 13 galleries from there. US galleries dropped from 26 last year to 7 this year. Plenty of bargains. Russian GMG Gallery sold 2 photographs by Anatoly Zhuravlev to a prominent Swiss collector of Chinese art.

Image carousel Telegraph – 19 images of artists: Isaac Montoya, Filomena Soares, Jose Batista Marques, Enrique Marty, Madeleine Berkhemer, Vivek Vilasini  (India), Jitish Kallat (India), Valay Shende, Eugenio Merino, Yi Hwan-Kon, Samuel Salcedo, Bernardi Roig.

Indian art draws Europeans IANS via Zee News – 13 Feb 2009 – New trend in Indian art away from works on canvas towards installation and new media apparent in gallery shows and  Panorama, the show of Indian art curated by Bose Krishnamachari. Dayanita Singh in solo show, Shilpa Gupta work finds European buyer.

Gloom at major European art fair as boom in sales seen over  – AFP  – 12 Feb 2009 – This is a prediction story about the mood prior to the event. Galleries predict  limited cash, prices down 25% for contemporary art, buyers will take time over purchases. Artist view: lower prices an opportunity for young. Includes image carousel.

Arco Madrid 2009 opens – calm forecast  – Art Daily – 12 Feb 2009 – This is a facts piece with a promotional tone. It covers details of the move to the new location and the fair’s programmes and projects: India is showcased, three curated shows cover performance art, contemporary art and technology in art, there is a list of talk forums by experts and a description of the section showcasing capsule collections from private museums.

Recession triggers improvement in Indian art qualitySindhToday via IANS – 11 February 2009 – This is a views piece about how the collector base for Indian art is changing and broadening particularly in Europe and is based on interviews with Bose Krishnamachari curator of the special Indian Panorama section and Peter Nagy of Nature Morte, an exhibitor.

Fine Art Publicity - click to buy

Fine Art Publicity - click to buy

Galleries drop out of ARCOArtinfo – 5 Feb 2009 – Edited version of Der Standard story below.

ARCO hit by crisis– Artforum via APAvia Der Standard – 3 Feb 2009 – 20 galleries of 270 cancelled – dropouts include 2 from South America, one from Spain and Lisson Gallery London. Portugese Ministry of Culture provided funding to prevent more.

Related links: ARCO website

Related posts:

Save time subscribe to Art Radar Asia for art news round-ups of important events

Posted in Acquisitions, Bose Krishnamachari, Collectors, Dayanita Singh, Electronic art, Fairs, Indian, Interactive art, Madrid, Market watch, New Media, Participatory, Shilpa Gupta, Spain, Virtual | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Japanese Indian artist Ashok Sukumaran creates mobile home installation in first major solo exhibition in Europe

Posted by artradar on February 4, 2009


Ashok Sukamaran Glow Positioning System

Ashok Sukamaran Glow Positioning System

 

 

Glow Positioning System map

Glow Positioning System map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bombay-based Ashok Sukumaran is one of the few artists in the world making work that directly addresses the issues of infrastructure in cities, electricity, water supply and other essential services. He produces startling public artworks that involve entire communities. This March he presents The Neighbour in P3, the massive construction halls buried deep under the University of Westminster in central London. Presented by The Arts Catalyst and P3, The Neighbour opens on 13 March 2009.This ambitious site-specific project is Sukumaran’s first major one-person exhibition in Europe. In The Neighbour, two mobile homes stand side by side, one fixed and shining brightly with energy, the other smaller and moveable. But in a reflection of the complex relationship between neighbours, each vehicle is subtly stalking one another, moving slowly like hunter and prey.

After researching the culture of fixed and moving mobile homes in the UK, Sukumaran found the metaphor of the nomadic travelling home compelling, trying to find power and resources as it can, as opposed to the fixed ‘residential’ mobile home, concealing only its symbolic wheels below the brickwork.

Sukumaran says: “This lurker, pest, potential collaborator, potential spy, potential contaminant appears often in my own recent work. For me, it is crucial to understanding the shape of relations in the electronic city not only as diagrams but as leakages, negotiations and refusals outside of the network paradigm.”

Ashok Sukumaran (b.1974) came to prominence internationally with the extraordinary work Glow Positioning System, a public lighting installation that involved collaborations with energy supply companies, shop owners and local residents to allow a hand-turned crank to operate a moving display of light around the buildings in a wide circle, so the ordinary public could literally control a ‘live’ panorama of light using the basic principles of electricity. He continued with linking a slum to a middle class area with a half-kilometre line of moving lights controlled by a button either end, in Two Poles. Sukumaran, winner of the first prize in the UNESCO Digital Arts Award and a Golden Nica at Ars Electronica, Austria, recently showed in Indian Highway at the Serpentine Gallery, London (with Shaina Anand) and is currently showing at the Sharjah Biennale.

The Neighbour is commissioned by The Arts Catalyst in partnership with P3. The Arts Catalyst is a leading London based interdisciplinary art organisation commissioning new work that experimentally and critically engages with science.

P3 is a 14000 square ft space developed from the vast former concrete construction hall for the University of Westminster’s School of Engineering. It has recently been described as ‘One of the capital’s hidden and most exciting new spaces’ by The Guardian.

The Ambika P3 programme commissions artists and researchers across creative disciplines, particularly those developing large-scale installations and prototyping, where full advantage can be taken of the large and accessible space.

Links: Artscatalyst, video of Glow Positioning System , Ashok Sukumaran wikipedia

Categories: Indian artists, Japanese artistsinstallations, reports from London, events now, events coming, emerging artists

Related posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar for the latest news about emerging artists and media

Posted in Electronic art, Emerging artists, Gallery shows, Indian, Installation, Interactive art, Japanese, London, Participatory, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

New roles for art collectors, organisations created by Cao Fei on Second Life – Uli Sigg is RMB City governor

Posted by artradar on January 30, 2009


Cao Fei RMB City A second life city planning 2007

Cao Fei RMB City A second life city planning 2007

 

INTERVIEW CHINESE ARTIST CAO FEI

Editor of Asia Art Archive’s Diaaalogue, Sue Acret spoke to Chinese artist Cao Fei about her Second Life project RMB City which was officially launched in January 2009. In this project which uses as a medium the online virtual world called Second Life, Cao Fei develops new roles for collectors and art institutions which blur the lines between digital and real.

Susan Acret: Please tell us about your avatar China Tracy and the RMB City work and how the online world of Second Life became a platform for these works.

RMB City – a city utopia with Chinese aesthetics

Cao Fei: During the creation of i.Mirror and the China Tracy Pavilion (A machinima-documentary about China Tracy’s first explorations of Second Life, and the large-scale installation where it premiered at the 2007 Venice Biennale), I started to think about creating a place that belonged to China Tracy within Second Life… her own ‘city utopia’. China Tracy felt that since most cities within Second Life were Western in style, she wanted to represent some of her concepts about Chinese urban development in a space that incorporated Chinese aesthetics and identity, albeit in a surreal hybrid style.

Blurred boundaries between real and virtual for modern generations
S.A: You’ve said that your generation, brought up in a digital world, ‘will always compare virtual and real’ and that sometimes the boundaries between the two can be blurred. Your art reflects this movement between these two spheres. What opportunities do virtual worlds offer artists that are not available in the ‘real’ world?

C.F: Second Life is a world where the conventional free-market economy still applies. Although we call it a virtual world, its economic structure and the virtual currency is tied with the ‘real’ economy. From a visual perspective, Second Life appears to be hyper-real and excessively imagined. Combined with its uncertain identity, it can be mysterious and enigmatic to people. On arriving in this virtual world, China Tracy was attracted by the hyper-real prison, but also felt an unavoidable sense of oppression.

Cao Fei i Mirror 28 min machinima

Cao Fei, i Mirror Second Life Machinima, 28 minutes

Although the boundary between virtual and real is becoming more and more blurred, the way the virtual world contradicts and coincides with reality offers something ambiguous and complex. This, to a certain extent, enhances our lives as a whole, providing a reference for the exploration of individuality and the nature of life.

Another reason that the virtual world appeals to me is that it transcends obstacles in reality, despite being hyper-real. It offers a virtual platform for human beings to experiment with a possible utopia, such as building an individualistic heaven, drafting laws and systems, generating new discussions and thoughts, etc.

 
S.A: How many collaborators have you worked with for your RMB City project? How do you find your collaborations with these ‘real’ people?

C.F: Collaborators involved in RMB City include collectors, galleries, scholars, researchers, artists, schools, various exhibition projects, commissioned projects, biennials and triennials, etc.

New roles for art collectors organisations, Uli Sigg is RMB City governor

1. Collectors
We invite collectors to actively participate in the actual development of the city. For example, we invited Mr Uli Sigg to be the first governor of the city (for 3 months), in order for him to oversee and propose a blueprint for the utopia of RMB City in terms of its systems, construction and direction.

2. Public organizations
We are now working closely with Serpentine Gallery. They are one of the real information centres for RMB City. Also, UCCA which will collect RMB City, will have a virtual art gallery and other independent projects. Some art organizations are willing to rent spaces to be involved in this project and also develop their own projects.

3. Exhibition/ Project
I have realized personal projects for biennials and triennials via RMB City, for example, for the 2008 Yokohama Triennial and New Orleans Biennial, as well as on some consigned projects, such as H Box’s video project. I would like to some overseas artist residency programs to take place the RMB City’s platform.

4. Other
We invite different parties (not just limited to the art field) in the real world to participate in the virtual world. We also invite Second Life avatars who are interested in our project.

Therefore, RMB City insists on ‘the cooperation of virtual and real’: collaborators should come from both worlds. Through this process, we hope to improve conventions and develop a new path.

Cao Fei Cosplayers, video 2004

Cao Fei Cosplayers, video 2004

S.A: Your use of internet platforms such as You Tube and Second Life is a democratic, open way of creating work, insofar as it is available freely to large numbers of people all over the world. Do you often get feedback from ‘non-art’ audiences on the internet?

C.F: Yes. I have received emails and messages to China Tracy in Second life, and comments on my YouTube videos, and friend-offers via My Space and Facebook.

I quite like these different forms of feedback from different channels, and meeting different people in different worlds.

S.A: Born in the late 1970s and brought up in the ’80s, can terminologies such as Generation X (the consumerist generation) or Generation Y (the Net-generation or Generation Why) describe who you are? From COSplayers to the RMB City project, are your art projects the result of generational influence or your personality?

C.F: Since 1978, China has undergone an inevitable reorganization. Before we were ready to respond, we were already receiving all kinds of influences from a new time. Everyone is the product of a generation; ‘I’ am an individual as well as a transcendental object. Perhaps a young person who attempts to influence the world or China Tracy who surfs around the virtual world, are indeed coming from the same route. And as for me, I remain extremely close to yet with an appropriate distance from any of these worlds. This gives me a macro view of the ‘world’. And then I decide how I should deal with it and derive my system to process all the complex messages of life. In Chinese terms, it involves entering (reality) and renouncing (the virtual) the world simultaneously. This journey is to experience both worlds while constituting the two.

This interview is edited. For the full version of this fascinating interview and more images go to Asia Art Archive.

Related categories: Chinese artists, virtual art, reports from China, video art, emerging artistsnew media, Uli Sigg, art collectors

Related posts:

Subscribe to Art Radar and stay up to date with emerging artists and trends

Posted in Anime, Cao Fei, Cartoon, China, Chinese, Collaborative, Collectors, Electronic art, Emerging artists, Fantasy art, Identity art, Individual, Interviews, New Media, Participatory, Social, Trends, Uli Sigg, Urban, Utopian art, Video, Virtual | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

4 Asian video artists make top 30 – Art Report’s international rankings

Posted by artradar on January 29, 2009


ASIAN VIDEO NEW MEDIA

Art-Report, a German art website, has published a list that ranks the top 30 living contemporary video artists globally. By video artist, it refers to artists whose works are based on video and film as their preferred medium. 

Although Asian artists are still in the minority, four artists – Yoko Ono, Paul Chan, Kutlug Ataman and Yang Fudong – are included in the rankings. Find below links and video clips for the three artists who have East Asian roots.

Ranked 3rd place is Yoko Ono. The Japanese avant-garde artist is dedicated to the formulation of conceptual and performance art. One of her representative performances is Cut Piece, in which Yoko Ono asked members of the audience to cut away her clothing piece by piece until she was almost naked.

 On 6 June 2009, her achievements were once again recognized as she received a Venice Biennale Accolade –the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement.

Link: Article on Golden Lion Award

At the 16th rank finds Paul Chan’s name. Paul Chan is Hong Kong-born but New York-based artist. Chan defines himself with a dual identity as an artist and activist. His works are characterized by the amalgamation of political, age-old, cutting-edge, religious and erotic elements.

Light and Drawings is Chan’s first major museum presentation in Europe in Stedelijk Museum. According to AbsoluteArts, Chan intended to make a group of works that delivers a physical experience and simultaneously provides a commentary on a world on the edge of disintegration. With one exception, the Lights are projected from the ceiling onto the floor, or partly on the floor and wall. The works are structured as a cycle of day and night, sunrise to sunset.

More on Paul Chan’s Work.             

The last Asian video artist in the list- Yang Fudong- stands at the 26th place. Carnegie International describes this Chinese artist’s films as psychologically dense, visually beautiful meditations on the philosophical questions of existence as they are played out in the exterior world and the interior lives of his subjects.

Below is a link to an article about his best-known work -“Seven Intellectuals in a Bamboo Forest”. The work depicts the journey of seven poets and artists as they move through various phases of experience in their quest to transcend their earthly lives.

Link:   Article – New York Times review 

LLH/KCE

Related Posts:

Subcribe to Art Radar Asia for more news on video artists and video art.

Posted in Animals, Body, Chinese, Electronic art, Hong Kong Artists, Insects, Japanese, Lists, New Media, Paul Chan, Performance, Social, Video, Videos, Yang Fudong, Yoko Ono | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Emerging Chinese artist Cao Fei’s first solo museum exhibition in Germany

Posted by artradar on January 5, 2009


Cao Fei Mirage

Cao Fei Mirage

EMERGING CHINESE ARTIST SHOW to 15 February 2009

Born in Guangzhou in 1978, Cao Fei is one of the most important Chinese artists of her generation. Since the turn of the millennium, she has gained considerable attention from international curators such as Melissa Chiu of the Asia Society in New York and renowned Chinese art collectors Uli Sigg and Wang Guanyi.

Cao Fei’s work was recently shown in London at China Power Station: Part 1, an off-site Serpentine Gallery exhibition of contemporary Chinese video, sound and installation art co-produced by The Red Mansion Foundation at Battersea Power Station.

Cao Fei is now particularly concerned with developing the technical possibilities of film, animation and the Internet in order to depict the swift and radical social and cultural changes in China. The exhibition presents her latest projects such as RMB City and i.Mirror. Since 2007 Cao Fei has been developing these utopian cities and future forms of living on the Net – on ‘Second Life’ – as her avatar China Tracy.

The exhibition in the Kunsthalle Nuremberg is the first comprehensive solo exhibition of the Chinese artist’s work in Germany, organised in collaboration with Vitamin Creative Space, Peking/Guangzhou and Le Plateau, Paris.

She grew up in a world dominated by advertising and the electronic entertainment industry as developed in Hong Kong and Taiwan, and in her video films and sculptural installations she combines the influences of a global post-Pop culture with traditional elements of opera, the theatre or dance.  Very quickly, Cao Fei developed a pictorial language entirely her own, in which she superimposes reality and fiction, and history and the present day. In ‘docu-dramas’ like Nu River (2007) or Cosplayers (2004) she consciously adopts a perspective that mediates between the inside and the outside viewpoints, interlocking documentation and fiction. 

 Kunsthalle Nuremberg Cao Fei exhibition

Related:

Posted in Anime, Chinese, Electronic art, Emerging artists, Interactive art, Museum shows, Performance, Photography, Video, Virtual | 2 Comments »

Emerging Taiwanese new media artist Huang Hsin-Chien at Shanghai Biennale 2008

Posted by artradar on October 1, 2008


Huang Hsin-Chien 'Shanghai Shall We Dance?' interactive installation

Huang Hsin-Chien

TAIWANESE ART SHANGHAI BIENNIAL
In Huang Hsin-Chien’s work, Shanghai, Shall We Dance? located in the public space of the Shanghai Museum of Art, viewers are invited on to a typical Shanghainese dance floor for a spontaneous dance. As the dancers move the images of foreboding highrise buildings surrounding them melt and transform into the images of the viewers dancing together. The direct real time link between the dancers’ movements and the artwork allows viewers to be participators in the creation of the artwork and according to Taiwan Contemporary Art Link explore their perceptions of and connections with urban space.

Huang Hsin-Chien has an unusual background. Having studied Mechanical Engineering at National Taiwan University and Art at the Art Center College of Design at Pasadena USA he has become fluent in both technology and traditional art. He has exhibited work at the Hong-Ga Museum, Taipei Artists’ Village and the National Fine Arts Museum in Taiwan as well as the MiArt Contemporary Art Fair in Milan.

Fascinated by interactive art using digital media, Huang exhibited a work called Experiment Exchange in the Natural Circuits show at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York in 2007. Experiment Exchange consists of a screen showing a silhouette of animated white birds which move in real time according to the actions of the viewer, a form of collaborative art in which viewers work together with technology and remotely from the original artist.

Click here for more on digital art, biennials, Taiwanese artists or collaborative art. Examples of Huang Hsin-Chien work available on youtube. Dealer, exhibition information on artfacts.net

Subscribe to Art Radar Asia

Posted in Biennials, China, Chinese, Electronic art, Emerging artists, Events, Human Body, Interactive art, New Media, Participatory, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Russian new media artists at MOMA Moscow where interest in electronic art grows

Posted by artradar on September 21, 2008


 

 

SURVEY NEW MEDIA ART RUSSIAN ARTISTS to 19 October 2008

CRITI-POP

Dates: September 19 – October 19, 2008
Location: Moscow Museum of Modern Art at Ermolaevsky lane, 17 (floors 2-5)

“It seems incredible, but interactive and communicative art in Russia is practiced only by Chernyshev, Shulgin and Efimov, working together or individually” says curator and gallerist Elena Selina. “Recently, interest in new media art has increased in Moscow. Not only professionals, but also collectors and the public, have overcome inner barriers that prevented (their acceptance) of the new media language”.

Presented by the Moscow Department of Culture, Russian Acacademy of Arts, the Moscow Museum of Modern Art with XL Gallery, the CRITI-POP exhibition showcases three artists, two creative groups, forty works and plenty of themes including information overflow, reconstruction of identity, genetic pop-engineering, the poetry of stock-exchange deals and news broadcasts, aesthetics of data transmission and science art.

Interactive installations by Vladislav Efimov and Aristarkh Chernyshev, who worked together from 1996 to 2005, bring us art that deals with genetic engineering, statistical modeling of processes, computer games and robotics. The viewer becomes a hero of the work — a colleague of an insane scientist modeling DNA, a creator of 3-D avatars, a conqueror of robots or a terminator hunting for artists.

Electroboutique  (Aristarkh Chernyshev and Alexei Shulgin since 2003) is a unique art group that unites artists, developers of electronics, programmers and designers. Using techniques taken from social psychology and perception theory, the artists transmit their critical message directly into the unconscious of the viewers and entertain them with bright colors and garish forms. In his solo projects, Aristarkh Chernyshev creates art from information streams like TV-channels, Internet-news or stock-exchange tapes while the solo work of Alexei Shulgin  looks at our addiction to technologies and gives variants of creative rescue. One of the historic exhibits is a legendary rock band 386 DX, made of an outdated computer playing ever-young hits of British-American and Russian rock.

Related:

Subscribe to Art Radar Asia

Posted in Curators, Electronic art, Gallery shows, Interactive art, Museum shows, New Media, Pop Art, Russian, Video, Virtual, West Asian | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Western art advisors turn to Asian new media art for their corporate clients – International Herald Tribune

Posted by artradar on September 5, 2008


NEW MEDIA ART FROM SOUTH EAST ASIA FOR COLLECTORS

Fortune Cookie projects, an art consulting service with clients who include Clifford Chance, Hermes, UBS and Saatchi, plan to set up headquarters in Singapore this year and they are on the look out for Asian new-media artists whom they can introduce to the West.

“Chinese artists have been the flavor of the month for the last five years,” founder Rutkowski said. “That will not cool, but it will change a bit. International collectors that went in early have got their works and they won’t buy an artist that they got for $20,000 a few years back for $4 million now; if anything, they’re going to sell. So many are looking along the Silk Road, and there is a very strong interest in the Southeast Asian region.”

 See (in new window)

If you enjoyed this post, click here to subscribe to Art Radar Asia

Posted in Acquisitions, Chinese, Collectors, Corporate collectors, Electronic art, Market watch, New Media, Video, Virtual | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »