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Archive for the ‘Urban’ Category

Why is Thailand difficult for street artists? Graffiti artist Bundit Puangthong explains

Posted by artradar on July 2, 2009


THAI STREET ART GRAFITTI

Thai artist Bundit Puangthong arrived in Melbourne 10 years ago and is a well established figure in the Australian art world, having staged highly successful exhibitions in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. He tells the Bangkok Post why Australia is a sanctuary for his street art.

I think people are freer to dabble in street art here in Australia than people in Thailand.

I also think that like mainstream art, street art is a luxury that a lot of Thais simply don’t have the time or money for. A lot of young Thai people study and work full-time as well as having responsibilities to their families, which does not leave a lot of time to be creative, or take part in activities such as street art.

Bundit Puangthong, Whisper

Bundit Puangthong, Whisper

Also, a lot of the Thai landscape or environment does not lend itself to street art. In Thailand there are not a lot of large clean walls waiting to be painted on like there are in Australia. In places like Bangkok, every little bit of the street is used by street hawkers, businesses, pedestrians, traffic, parking, etc. It is already very visually chaotic.

We are spoiled in Australia for having the money, time, space and freedom to express ourselves the way we wish to.

Bangkok Post for more

Bundit Puangthong fuses his training in traditional Thai art with a modern Western-based arts practice. His paintings incorporate elements of traditional Thai art, American pop art and contemporary street art in attempt to strike a balance between the cultures in which he lives. His work explores a diversity of themes, from his own understanding(s) of Buddhism and how this fits into life in Australia, through historical stories of Buddha and aspects of Thai culture such as superstition and royalty. Drawing on his traditional Lai Thai Arts Training his paintings are rich in symbology.

See his work and bio on Bundit Puangthong website

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Posted in Asia expands, Australia, Buddhist art, Classic/Contemporary, Open air, Thai, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Taiwanese photographers, video artists and an architect at 53rd Venice Biennale

Posted by artradar on May 25, 2009


TAIWANESE ARTISTS VENICE BIENNALE

Though they span architecture, film and photography, the four Taiwanese artists featured in the 53rd Venice Biennale exhibition ‘Foreign Affairs’ share a common focus. Each looks at the unequal treatment of the disadvantaged in the midst of globalisation, and has taken action through distinctive, personal, and practical means.

Furthermore, they have all engaged in dialogue and interaction with other areas of the world.

 

Hsieh Ying-Chun

Hsieh Ying-Chun

 

Hsieh Ying-Chun

 

Hsieh Ying-Chun (* 1954) is a Taiwanese architect who for years has worked to provide minorities and disadvantaged members of society with collaborative construction.
More than an architect, Hsieh is an architectural activist who takes social, cultural and economic limitations and ecological concerns into consideration to create works that embody the ideals of “sustainable construction”.
Hsieh Ying-Chun opposes modernist division of labour and classification.

 

Chen Chieh-Jen, Empire's Borders, DVD

Chen Chieh-Jen, Empire's Borders, DVD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chen Chieh-Jen

The insulting treatment recently accorded Chen Chieh-Jen while applying for a U.S. visa has precipitated discussion of the plight of the Taiwanese people under the post-Cold War, post-colonial, and neo-liberalist global order.

The new work, Empire’s Borders (2009), is a film that opens showing the various and sundry checks that Taiwanese citizens must endure when applying for a U.S. visa for business, tourism, or family reasons.

Watch excerpts from Chen Chieh-jen’s complete video works at the Asia Society… on the effects of globalization on the marginalized in society… and Lingchi Executions

Chien-Chi Chang, China Town Series, Chen X Family, 2007 C Print
Chien-Chi Chang, China Town Series

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Chien-Chi Chang

Among his best known works are photos chronicling illegal workers in New York’s Chinatown (China Town); The Chain, a series of photographs taken at Longfatang, a controversial psychiatric shelter in southern Taiwan; and the matchmaking and courting rituals that bring Taiwanese men and Vietnamese women together in marriage (Double Happiness).

Chang began his chronicling of the lives of illegal immigrants on the streets of New York’s Chinatown in 1992, traveling to Fujian province in China to visit their families and relate the unique tales of these people that live on the margins of society. Hong John Lin notes that the most remarkable aspect of the photography process is that “the photographer becomes a part of the subjects’ lives, so that a total state of disarmament is reflected in front of the camera.”

Chien-Chi Chang on wikipedia

Cheng-Ta Yu, Ventriloquists, Video, 2009

Cheng-Ta Yu, Ventriloquists, Video, 2009

Cheng – Ta Yu

Cheng-Ta Yu’s latest work is a video documentation of two Philippine women who married Taiwanese men and work in the same building in Taipei.

After more than a decade living in Taiwan, local language has become a tool in their daily lives, but in his interaction with them, Yu tries out three different languages (Mandarin, Taiwanese, and English), taking on some of their idiosyncratic pronunciations in his conversations.

To conclude the video with a note of levity, the women sing a song in Mandarin in an effort to liberate everyone from the language barriers that inevitably formed in their conversation.

Source: Press release via Universes in Universe

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Posted in Activist, Biennials, Crossover art, Domestic, Identity art, Italy, Nationalism, Photography, Political, Social, Taiwanese, Urban, Venice, Video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Hong Kong artists showcased for first time at Sotheby’s Asian art sale 2009

Posted by artradar on April 13, 2009


HONG KONG ART AUCTION

The Spring 2009 sale of contemporary Asian art saw Sotheby’s present a collection of 8 Hong Kong artists. This is the first time that any auction house has offered a series dedicated to Hong Kong art in a contemporary art sale. The artworks are concerned with significant historical Hong Kong events including the 1997 Handover of the British colony to China, the 2003 SARS epidemic and the annual July 1st protests as well as the experience of living in Hong Kong’s cramped urban cityscape.

All of the lots were sold at estimate or more. Kum Chi Keung, Kevin Fung and the Kowloon Emperor achieved sale prices which were double or several multiples of the estimate.

Kum Chi Keung

Kum Chi Keung

Kum Chi Keung (b 1965) was initially a practitioner of Chinese traditional ink painting but then extended his practice to installation art which featured his favoured motifs of a birdcage and flight. He uses these ideas as a metaphor for not only the scarcity of space in Hong Kong but also for the idea of the 1997 Handover of Hong Kong from British colonial rule back to China when many locals emigrated or obtained foreign passports. Estimate HK$55-65000 excl premium and HK$127, 500 incl premium.

Freeman Lau (b1958) is a renowned designer as well as artist and uses the chair as a symbol in his practice to represent ‘place’ and ‘power’. In 1998 after the Handover Freeman Lau took a heap of standard chairs used by the colonial government and at the Fringe Club’s Out of Chaos, the Search for Position 11 arranged them in a haphazard wall. This represented not only the power of the colonial government but the disorder and confusion of Hong Kong’s inhabitants.

Tsang Tsou Choi

Tsang Tsou Choi

Tsang, Tsou Chin aka The Kowloon Emperor is a Hong Kong legend, famous for his calligraphy graffiti which he painted on public furniture. Undeterred by numerous warnings he roamed the streets for 50 years laying down his family genealogy and his personal history as an emperor in exile in blatant defiance of the Queen and English colonial rule. Deemed a lunatic by some, he was nevertheless recognised when in 2003 he became the very first Hong Kong artist to exhibit at the Venice Biennale. With a pre-premium estimate of HK$20,000 to HK$30,000 the lot attracted a number of bidders and was eventually sold for HK$212,500 including premium. (HK$7,7=US$1)

Man Fung Yi, Tranquillity

Man Fung Yi, Tranquillity

The SARS epidemic of 2003 was a monumental influence on Man Fung Yi‘s practice. That year her younger sister’s life hung by a thread after contracting SARS and being forced to abort her 27 week old fetus. Earlier in 2001 when she herself was pregnant using lit joss sticks she singed holdes into silk cloths and created patterns as a form of prayer. She re-enacted the ritual as an expression of gratitude when her sister regained her health. The arrangement of embroidery-like holes has become an abiding motif in her work.

Kevin Fung, Lik Yan (b 1964) has been an apprentice of Hong Kong artist woodcarver Tong King Sum since 1993 and his work expresses the stress and suffering of living in Hong Kong’s cramped urban spaces. His Baggage Series was selected for the 15th Hong Kong Art Biennial and is in the permanent collection of Hong Kong art museum. Estimate HK$80-100,000 excl premium, sale HK$212,500 incl premium.

Chow Chun Fai (b 1980) excels at capturing unnoticed details of Hong Kong daily life in his work. In his Painting on Movie series he appropriates images from Hong Kong movies.

Anothermountainman Stanley Wong, Ping Pui was selected as one of the representatives of Hong Kong art at the 51st Venice Biennale of 2005. He is an accomplished creative director of advertisements as well as films. In 2000 he began incorporating red, white and blue nylon fabric in his works, a material which is ubiquitous in Hong Kong and used in a variety of ways from  covering buildings under construction to creating bags. This durable fabric represents the spirit of the Hong Kong people: versatile and resilient.

John Fung, Kin Chung

John Fung, Kin Chung

John Fung, Kin-Chung is a photographer who produces photographs of iconic urban vistas which include Hong Kong’s skyscrapers and the Mid-levels escalator which is the longest outdoor escalator in the world. He manipulates the images to create disjointed kaleidocopic patterns representing the discomfort and sensory overload of living in Hong Kong.

Source: Sotheby’s catalogue Contemporary Asian Art April 2009 Hong Kong.

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Posted in Activist, Auctions, Calligraphy, Graffiti, Hong Kong, Hong Kong Artists, Market watch, Nationalism, Political, Social, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Japanese Indian artist Ashok Sukumaran creates mobile home installation in first major solo exhibition in Europe

Posted by artradar on February 4, 2009


Ashok Sukamaran Glow Positioning System

Ashok Sukamaran Glow Positioning System

 

 

Glow Positioning System map

Glow Positioning System map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bombay-based Ashok Sukumaran is one of the few artists in the world making work that directly addresses the issues of infrastructure in cities, electricity, water supply and other essential services. He produces startling public artworks that involve entire communities. This March he presents The Neighbour in P3, the massive construction halls buried deep under the University of Westminster in central London. Presented by The Arts Catalyst and P3, The Neighbour opens on 13 March 2009.This ambitious site-specific project is Sukumaran’s first major one-person exhibition in Europe. In The Neighbour, two mobile homes stand side by side, one fixed and shining brightly with energy, the other smaller and moveable. But in a reflection of the complex relationship between neighbours, each vehicle is subtly stalking one another, moving slowly like hunter and prey.

After researching the culture of fixed and moving mobile homes in the UK, Sukumaran found the metaphor of the nomadic travelling home compelling, trying to find power and resources as it can, as opposed to the fixed ‘residential’ mobile home, concealing only its symbolic wheels below the brickwork.

Sukumaran says: “This lurker, pest, potential collaborator, potential spy, potential contaminant appears often in my own recent work. For me, it is crucial to understanding the shape of relations in the electronic city not only as diagrams but as leakages, negotiations and refusals outside of the network paradigm.”

Ashok Sukumaran (b.1974) came to prominence internationally with the extraordinary work Glow Positioning System, a public lighting installation that involved collaborations with energy supply companies, shop owners and local residents to allow a hand-turned crank to operate a moving display of light around the buildings in a wide circle, so the ordinary public could literally control a ‘live’ panorama of light using the basic principles of electricity. He continued with linking a slum to a middle class area with a half-kilometre line of moving lights controlled by a button either end, in Two Poles. Sukumaran, winner of the first prize in the UNESCO Digital Arts Award and a Golden Nica at Ars Electronica, Austria, recently showed in Indian Highway at the Serpentine Gallery, London (with Shaina Anand) and is currently showing at the Sharjah Biennale.

The Neighbour is commissioned by The Arts Catalyst in partnership with P3. The Arts Catalyst is a leading London based interdisciplinary art organisation commissioning new work that experimentally and critically engages with science.

P3 is a 14000 square ft space developed from the vast former concrete construction hall for the University of Westminster’s School of Engineering. It has recently been described as ‘One of the capital’s hidden and most exciting new spaces’ by The Guardian.

The Ambika P3 programme commissions artists and researchers across creative disciplines, particularly those developing large-scale installations and prototyping, where full advantage can be taken of the large and accessible space.

Links: Artscatalyst, video of Glow Positioning System , Ashok Sukumaran wikipedia

Categories: Indian artists, Japanese artistsinstallations, reports from London, events now, events coming, emerging artists

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Posted in Electronic art, Emerging artists, Gallery shows, Indian, Installation, Interactive art, Japanese, London, Participatory, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

What are latest trends in Chinese art, who are the top two emerging artists? Melissa Chiu video

Posted by artradar on February 1, 2009


CHINESE ART TRENDS

Australian curator and writer Melissa Chiu of the Asia Society New York discusses the newest trends from China in a video called Inside The Contemporary Art Scene.

She identifies several emerging changes:

  • young Chinese women are emerging as a force for the first time
  • new technology is being adopted and young artists are excelling at video and other new media
  • China’s experience as a world centre of manufacturing has influenced the scale and construction of art from China and beyond its borders, particularly evident in the activities is Zhang Huan
  • influence of artists in their fifties driven abroad by the Cultural Revolution and now returning to work in China
  • two emerging artists are singled out : Cao Fei for her work on Second Life and Yang Fudong for his videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhsCDqGb_LE

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Posted in Cao Fei, Chinese, Emerging artists, Fantasy art, Feminist art, Interviews, New Media, Overviews, Social, Surveys, Urban, Utopian art, Video, Zhang Huan | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

New roles for art collectors, organisations created by Cao Fei on Second Life – Uli Sigg is RMB City governor

Posted by artradar on January 30, 2009


Cao Fei RMB City A second life city planning 2007

Cao Fei RMB City A second life city planning 2007

 

INTERVIEW CHINESE ARTIST CAO FEI

Editor of Asia Art Archive’s Diaaalogue, Sue Acret spoke to Chinese artist Cao Fei about her Second Life project RMB City which was officially launched in January 2009. In this project which uses as a medium the online virtual world called Second Life, Cao Fei develops new roles for collectors and art institutions which blur the lines between digital and real.

Susan Acret: Please tell us about your avatar China Tracy and the RMB City work and how the online world of Second Life became a platform for these works.

RMB City – a city utopia with Chinese aesthetics

Cao Fei: During the creation of i.Mirror and the China Tracy Pavilion (A machinima-documentary about China Tracy’s first explorations of Second Life, and the large-scale installation where it premiered at the 2007 Venice Biennale), I started to think about creating a place that belonged to China Tracy within Second Life… her own ‘city utopia’. China Tracy felt that since most cities within Second Life were Western in style, she wanted to represent some of her concepts about Chinese urban development in a space that incorporated Chinese aesthetics and identity, albeit in a surreal hybrid style.

Blurred boundaries between real and virtual for modern generations
S.A: You’ve said that your generation, brought up in a digital world, ‘will always compare virtual and real’ and that sometimes the boundaries between the two can be blurred. Your art reflects this movement between these two spheres. What opportunities do virtual worlds offer artists that are not available in the ‘real’ world?

C.F: Second Life is a world where the conventional free-market economy still applies. Although we call it a virtual world, its economic structure and the virtual currency is tied with the ‘real’ economy. From a visual perspective, Second Life appears to be hyper-real and excessively imagined. Combined with its uncertain identity, it can be mysterious and enigmatic to people. On arriving in this virtual world, China Tracy was attracted by the hyper-real prison, but also felt an unavoidable sense of oppression.

Cao Fei i Mirror 28 min machinima

Cao Fei, i Mirror Second Life Machinima, 28 minutes

Although the boundary between virtual and real is becoming more and more blurred, the way the virtual world contradicts and coincides with reality offers something ambiguous and complex. This, to a certain extent, enhances our lives as a whole, providing a reference for the exploration of individuality and the nature of life.

Another reason that the virtual world appeals to me is that it transcends obstacles in reality, despite being hyper-real. It offers a virtual platform for human beings to experiment with a possible utopia, such as building an individualistic heaven, drafting laws and systems, generating new discussions and thoughts, etc.

 
S.A: How many collaborators have you worked with for your RMB City project? How do you find your collaborations with these ‘real’ people?

C.F: Collaborators involved in RMB City include collectors, galleries, scholars, researchers, artists, schools, various exhibition projects, commissioned projects, biennials and triennials, etc.

New roles for art collectors organisations, Uli Sigg is RMB City governor

1. Collectors
We invite collectors to actively participate in the actual development of the city. For example, we invited Mr Uli Sigg to be the first governor of the city (for 3 months), in order for him to oversee and propose a blueprint for the utopia of RMB City in terms of its systems, construction and direction.

2. Public organizations
We are now working closely with Serpentine Gallery. They are one of the real information centres for RMB City. Also, UCCA which will collect RMB City, will have a virtual art gallery and other independent projects. Some art organizations are willing to rent spaces to be involved in this project and also develop their own projects.

3. Exhibition/ Project
I have realized personal projects for biennials and triennials via RMB City, for example, for the 2008 Yokohama Triennial and New Orleans Biennial, as well as on some consigned projects, such as H Box’s video project. I would like to some overseas artist residency programs to take place the RMB City’s platform.

4. Other
We invite different parties (not just limited to the art field) in the real world to participate in the virtual world. We also invite Second Life avatars who are interested in our project.

Therefore, RMB City insists on ‘the cooperation of virtual and real’: collaborators should come from both worlds. Through this process, we hope to improve conventions and develop a new path.

Cao Fei Cosplayers, video 2004

Cao Fei Cosplayers, video 2004

S.A: Your use of internet platforms such as You Tube and Second Life is a democratic, open way of creating work, insofar as it is available freely to large numbers of people all over the world. Do you often get feedback from ‘non-art’ audiences on the internet?

C.F: Yes. I have received emails and messages to China Tracy in Second life, and comments on my YouTube videos, and friend-offers via My Space and Facebook.

I quite like these different forms of feedback from different channels, and meeting different people in different worlds.

S.A: Born in the late 1970s and brought up in the ’80s, can terminologies such as Generation X (the consumerist generation) or Generation Y (the Net-generation or Generation Why) describe who you are? From COSplayers to the RMB City project, are your art projects the result of generational influence or your personality?

C.F: Since 1978, China has undergone an inevitable reorganization. Before we were ready to respond, we were already receiving all kinds of influences from a new time. Everyone is the product of a generation; ‘I’ am an individual as well as a transcendental object. Perhaps a young person who attempts to influence the world or China Tracy who surfs around the virtual world, are indeed coming from the same route. And as for me, I remain extremely close to yet with an appropriate distance from any of these worlds. This gives me a macro view of the ‘world’. And then I decide how I should deal with it and derive my system to process all the complex messages of life. In Chinese terms, it involves entering (reality) and renouncing (the virtual) the world simultaneously. This journey is to experience both worlds while constituting the two.

This interview is edited. For the full version of this fascinating interview and more images go to Asia Art Archive.

Related categories: Chinese artists, virtual art, reports from China, video art, emerging artistsnew media, Uli Sigg, art collectors

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Posted in Anime, Cao Fei, Cartoon, China, Chinese, Collaborative, Collectors, Electronic art, Emerging artists, Fantasy art, Identity art, Individual, Interviews, New Media, Participatory, Social, Trends, Uli Sigg, Urban, Utopian art, Video, Virtual | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Indian contemporary art survey Chalo at Mori in Japan to March 2009

Posted by artradar on November 24, 2008


Bharti Kher The Skin Speaks a Language not its Own

Bharti Kher The Skin Speaks a Language not its Own

 

 

INDIAN CONTEMPORARY ART SURVEY

Chalo! India: A New Era of Indian Art 22 November to 15 March 2009

From the press release:
“Chalo” is Hindi for “Let’s go.” With the words “Chalo! India” (Let’s go! India), we invite you to discover an explosion of creativity and vitality in Indian contemporary art. “Chalo! India” will take you on a journey through more than 100 works by 27 artists and artist groups from all over India. Encompassing a broad range of media, including painting, sculpture, photography and installation, this exhibition examines the latest movements in Indian contemporary art.

Movements and themes: modernisn, political criticism, urbanisation and globalisaton

Following independence from Britain in 1947, Indian artists began exploring new forms of artistic expressions-drawing inspiration and ideas from Western modernism, and India’s own distinctive culture. Over the next 60 years, new types of work that powerfully embodied political and social critiques emerged. More recently, Indian artists have been making works that respond to urbanization and changing contemporary lifestyles-art that reflects the rapid economic development, and globalization that has taken hold since the 1990s. Today the lively Indian art scene is spreading its wings both at home and abroad, and has been attracting a great deal of international attention.

“Chalo! India” is a significant survey of new Indian art, including a sociological research project involving architects and intellectuals, and state of the art interactive media work-as befits an IT giant such as India. Most people see India in terms of its rich and influential history, its Gods and devotion, Bollywood movies, or its awakening as an economic giant. However, there is so much more to the complex and dynamic India of today. “Chalo! India” explores and celebrates the depth of this country; the contradictions of its society, the dreams and hopes of its people, and its energy and passion toward the future.

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Posted in Indian, Japan, Jitish Kallat, Justin Ponmany, Museum shows, New Media, Political, Shilpa Gupta, Subodh Gupta, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Top three Middle Eastern art show treats in Dubai winter 2008

Posted by artradar on November 3, 2008


MIDDLE EASTERN ART

A quick glance at three interesting shows in Dubai this autumn throws up a plethora of talent.

 

Huda Lutfi

Huda Lutfi

Huda Lutfi at The Third Line 13 November – 4 December 2008

One of Egypt’s most notable contemporary artists, Huda Lutfi presents her exhibition Zan’it Al-Sittat, an exploration into the city of Cairo, and more specifically, the visibility of women in Egyptian culture and society.

Both historian and artist, Lutfi is a bricoleur. She collects disparate images and manipulates them to re-invent her personal vision of Cairo, its histories and events. In doing so, Lutfi simultaneously comments on the political relevance of her home country, lifting old feminine icons from history and giving them new life by re-contextualising historic time lines, creating hybridised, timeless female figures.

Third Line Gallery

Khosrow Hassanzadeh at B21 11 November to 12 December 2008

Born to an Azerbaijani family in 1963 in Tehran , Khosrow Hassanzadeh spent most of his childhood in museums and cinemas – a refuge from the busy streets of Tehran , where he sold bananas to tourists near the National Museum of Iran. As a teenager he volunteered to fight on the Iran-Iraq front, not expecting that he would stay as a recruit for several years. When he came back from war, having escaped death, he chose a discipline that he always dreamt about: painting and poetry. Since then, Hassanzadeh has exhibited worldwide in leading art galleries and his works adorn the walls of several public collections such as the British Museum , London , The World Bank in Washington DC and the Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art.

 

Faisal Samra at XVA Gallery 27 October – 13 November 2008

‘I started out experimenting on another shape, another support on which to paint.’ Saudi artist Faisal Samra has pulled out pieces that he produced back in 2001 for this latest show. Moving away from a traditional canvas stretched two-dimensionally flat, Samra wraps his canvas around a wire mesh. The canvas itself wrinkles into a leathery skin-like form and, when hung, it takes on the slightly unnerving shape of a human torso. 

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Posted in Dubai, Egyptian, Feminist art, Gallery shows, Iranian, Political, Saudi, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Chinese urban art exhibition in London shows new art medium laser tagging

Posted by artradar on October 4, 2008


Laser tagging in Hong Kong

Laser tagging in Hong Kong

URBAN CHINESE ART SHOW LONDON to 21 November 2008

Organised by Red Mansion Foundation, DOWN TOWN PRODUCTION is an exhibition of Chinese Urban Art
curated by Yan Lei 23rd September – 21st November 2008.

The artists will give us a taste of China’s emerging popular culture, with works such as ground-breaking L.A.S.E.R. graffiti by conceptual artist, DJ and rapper, MC Yan. L.A.S.E.R. tagging is the very newest form of graffiti art developed only a year ago and currently cropping up in cities all over the world. There will be a laser-tagging event and music performance by Chinese punk band Brain Failure on 17 October attached to the exhibition. 

Check out some laser tagging on video at: graffiti research lab

Down Town Production is a dynamic group show bringing cutting-edge, urban Chinese art to the UK. Curated by one of China’s leading artists, Yan Lei, the exhibition brings together eight rising stars of contemporary Chinese art whose work reflects the recent dramatic social and economic transformation of China. It is anticipated that 70% of China’s 1.3 billion population will live in urban areas by 2035. At the end of 2002, records showed that China’s urban population totalled 502 million, living in over 21,000 towns and cities. Down Town Production is a selection of art that reflects and explores this dramatic shift.

Artists include:

  • MC Yan, conceptual artist, graffiti artist and rapper
  • Liu Ding, installation and multimedia artist, part of Complete Art Experience Project group
  • Hong Hao, photographer and graphic artist
  • Meng Liuding, leading abstract painter
  • Liu Zhenchen, photographer and video artist based in Paris
  • Lao Liu, musician turned photographer with interest in North Korea
  • Zhao Shaoruo, Finland and Beijing based photographer, exhibited V&A
  • Wang Hui, avant garde architect and designer

Find more information on artists at Red Mansion Foundation website here

Hong Hao

Hong Hao

Down Town Production is being staged by The Red Mansion Foundation, which has been working to bring China’s contemporary art scene to the UK for almost a decade, discovering new talent and establishing an exchange program between London and China for some of the biggest names in contemporary art. Many of the works in the exhibition will be for sale.

The Down Town Production show will take place both inside and outside the Red Mansion Foundation’s gallery space, which will be completely transformed for the purpose of this exhibition. Curator, Yan Lei, will distort the traditional “white cube” concept and create a totally new environment for the show that will be particularly striking in the context of the Red Mansion, a listed Robert Adam building.

The exhibition will include a one-off special performance by Brain Failure, trailblazers in China’s burgeoning punk scene, who will play at the ICA on 17th October. Formed in 1997, the band were the first to emerge from the People’s Republic of China, embracing Western punk ideals and now enjoying commercial success at home and in the US. This will be their first UK performance, and offers an insight into a youth movement that is gathering force. The bill also includes Stanley Kubrick Goes Shopping, a new collaboration between Youth of Killing Joke and Dennis Morris, lead vocalist of Basement 5 and music photographer, famed for his seminal images of the Sex Pistols and Bob Marley.

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Posted in Chinese, Critic, Gallery shows, Graffiti, Laser, London, New Media, Open air, Performance, Photography, UK, Urban | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Emerging Taiwanese new media artist Huang Hsin-Chien at Shanghai Biennale 2008

Posted by artradar on October 1, 2008


Huang Hsin-Chien 'Shanghai Shall We Dance?' interactive installation

Huang Hsin-Chien

TAIWANESE ART SHANGHAI BIENNIAL
In Huang Hsin-Chien’s work, Shanghai, Shall We Dance? located in the public space of the Shanghai Museum of Art, viewers are invited on to a typical Shanghainese dance floor for a spontaneous dance. As the dancers move the images of foreboding highrise buildings surrounding them melt and transform into the images of the viewers dancing together. The direct real time link between the dancers’ movements and the artwork allows viewers to be participators in the creation of the artwork and according to Taiwan Contemporary Art Link explore their perceptions of and connections with urban space.

Huang Hsin-Chien has an unusual background. Having studied Mechanical Engineering at National Taiwan University and Art at the Art Center College of Design at Pasadena USA he has become fluent in both technology and traditional art. He has exhibited work at the Hong-Ga Museum, Taipei Artists’ Village and the National Fine Arts Museum in Taiwan as well as the MiArt Contemporary Art Fair in Milan.

Fascinated by interactive art using digital media, Huang exhibited a work called Experiment Exchange in the Natural Circuits show at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York in 2007. Experiment Exchange consists of a screen showing a silhouette of animated white birds which move in real time according to the actions of the viewer, a form of collaborative art in which viewers work together with technology and remotely from the original artist.

Click here for more on digital art, biennials, Taiwanese artists or collaborative art. Examples of Huang Hsin-Chien work available on youtube. Dealer, exhibition information on artfacts.net

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