Art Radar Asia

Contemporary art trends and news from Asia and beyond

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Archive for the ‘Uncategorised’ Category

Watch Simon Birch’s video tour of conceptual circus ‘Hope and Glory’ in Hong Kong

Posted by artradar on May 19, 2010


HONG KONG PUBLIC ART EXHIBITION VIDEO TOUR

For international art lovers who aren’t able to see the sprawling conceptual circus for themselves, Simon Birch guides viewers through his masterful art event “Hope & Glory”.

Watch the videos to see the artworks and gain insight into the artist’s intention.

EW/KN

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Posted in Events, Hong Kong, Hong Kong Artists, Interviews, Nonprofit, Research, Resources, Simon Birch, Uncategorised, Valerie Doran, Video | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Art Radar needs your help….

Posted by artradar on May 10, 2010


We have been mulling and scratching our heads and doing a lot of thinking….. What kind of information is needed about contemporary Asian art? What are the problems, what is missing, what could be expanded and what could be done better?

Well – we came up with an idea. But before we go ahead and develop our idea we would like to humbly request your input.

If you like Art Radar and feel that you would like to give us something back for the free content our team has been creating over the last 2 years, we would love it if you would give  us just 6 minutes of your time for a 10 question survey.

Click through to find out about our idea and take a very quick survey

Thanks so much!

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Killer art selling tips: viral video

Posted by artradar on April 21, 2010


SALES ART BUSINESS PROMOTION ARTIST

Do you need some new ideas for promoting your art, your event or your artists? Read on for one piece of advice which could make your promotion go viral on social media attracting thousands of new fans.

Did you know that bloggers love to link to video? And did you also know that bloggers in the same niche often read and link to one another? You can harness these habits to spread the word about your art works far and wide.

Most art promoters are doing little to ride the power of video and social media marketing to get their art out there. This is surprising because art is a visual medium and is particularly suited to video promotion. Text and static images on press releases just aren’t the same.

Imagine! Sculptures can be seen from different angles, kinetic sculptures can be appreciated in motion. Artists can be interviewed helping bring their work to life with personal stories. Techniques can be demonstrated. Small clips of video art can be posted as a teaser or taster. Artists can create a more personal connection with collectors and dealers can build trust with video.

News sources like CNN produce the most widely-viewed videos about shows and artists because of their superior page ranking.  Some museums are making great strides in producing video as a documentary source and for promotional purposes (take a look at the Asia Society).  As yet there are still surprisingly few galleries, artists and collectors using in these ways.

What is stopping you from making videos? Is it expense, know how, time constraints or something else? Would you like more information about promoting art? Or making art videos? We would love to know. Leave your comments below.

In the meantime if you have made a video, well done you are ahead of many of your competitors but don’t be shy. Post it on youtube (it is more likely to appear on the first page of google there than on your own site) and actively promote it to bloggers and on twitter.

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KCE

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Three leading Chinese art curators to educate collectors at Asia Art Forum 2010

Posted by artradar on April 20, 2010


COURSES  CHINESE HONG KONG ART AND COLLECTING

 

Three top Chinese contemporary art curators will come together for the first time in Hong Kong. Along with market experts they will be at the Asia Art Forum 2010 to help fulfill an unmet need: educating hungry collectors in Asia.  The 3rd edition of Asia Art Forum gives special focus to Chinese art and examines Hong Kong art for first time.

The third edition of Asia Art Forum will be held in Hong Kong on May 21-23 2010 just a few days before ArtHK, Hong Kong’s leading art fair.

For the first time it will bring together three of China’s leading curators: Karen Smith, author of “Nine Lives: The Birth of the Avant Garde in New China”, Philip Tinari influential scholar and editor of China art magazine LEAP and Valerie Doran curator and expert on Hong Kong’s contemporary art.

These three prominent international art opinion leaders will be talking at the Asia Art Forum fulfilling an unmet need: to educate and encourage fledgling and established collectors in Asia who are hungry for more information.

Study of Hong Kong art for first time

For the first time in its third edition, Asia Art Forum will be giving special focus to the art scene of Hong Kong, Hong Kong resident and curator Valerie Doran will analyse the evolution of art in Hong Kong over the last decade from an art scene that operated outside of commercial pressure to the moment last year when Hong Kong artists were being championed by the auction houses in their 2009 sales.

Why the Asia Art Forum was established

Pippa Dennis established Asia Art Forum in Shanghai in 2008 when she experienced first hand a gap in Asia’s art ecology. ” I worked in a gallery in Shanghai and collectors and art professionals alike were hungry for information. I realised there was a need for education but these art worlds were developing at such a pace it was impossible to find courses that were up to date. It was at this point I realised the only way to make it work was to collaborate with the curators and critics working on the ground in these areas who were actually part of these evolving art histories, pivotol figures in their development. My vision is to create small and intimate Forums where collectors, art professionals, art lovers can listen to the best of Asia’s art community in an atmosphere where discussion and dialogue is possible and encouraged.”

The first Asia Art Forum was held in Shanghai in the autumn of 2008. In 2009 the Forum was brought to Hong Kong. “The positive response was overwhelming and we are coming back this year. Hong Kong’s geographical location works well as it allows people to fly in from the region for the course,. The presence of ArtHK, the Hong Kong art fair which starts just after Asia Art Forum finishes, enables the attendees to then experience first hand some of the work we have been looking at in the Forum.”

What people are saying about the need for Asia Art Forum

Jehan Chu, a Hong Kong-based consultant to collectors in Asia and former speaker explains how Asia Art Forum meets an important need. “Collector education is one of the most important challenges facing the development of a mature Asian art environment. The thing that makes Asia Art Forum so special is that they’re helping to provide a balanced and real world perspective to collectors, something sorely lacking in this turbulent market. Top auction house experts, museum curators, and art advisors are all on hand to share their experiences in a frank and practical voice.” Jehan Chu, Arts advisor, Hong Kong

One of the participants in last year’s Asia Art Forum, Kristina Perez added, “I attended the Asia Art Forum’s lecture series last year on the historical development of the emerging Asian art scene. I decided to attend the lecture course since I did my undergraduate degree in the History of Art at Cambridge where there were no courses offered on contemporary Asian art. As a journalist covering the arts in Beijing and Hong Kong I had been scrambling to plug the gaps in my knowledge as quickly as possible. I found the lectures highly structured and compelling, and they went a long way to putting in context the modern movements of art in China, Japan and Korea. The handbook that was provided has also become my go-to cheat-sheet. The Asia Art Forum’s lecture series are an extremely useful tool for professional development and continuing education.”

China focus this year

This year the Forum will have a different flavour. In the last two editions curators and experts from different parts of Asia attended. This edition curators will be focused only on contemporary art from China and Hong Kong.

The Forum will be giving particular attention to the contrasting art practices from these two regions over the last decade for example the big productions values available to mainland artists in China compared with the unique vernacular developed by artists in the confined space of Hong Kong.

Collecting with Dr Oei

The role of the collector in Asia will be examined. Dr Oei, South East Asia’s most prominent collector, will talk about his personal journey from afficionado to building the most important collection of art in South East Asia today.

The Asia Art Forum also examines the current state of the Asian art market following an extraordinary year of events with Phillips de Pury’s Asian specialist Jeremy Wingfield.

Booking and more information

For booking form contact info@asiaartforum.com or call (852) 6103 0470 or (44) 7786 110 www.asiaartforum.com 

Valerie Doran

Valerie Doran

 

Valerie C DORAN

Valerie C Doran is a critic, curator, and translator specializing in the field of contemporary Asian art with a special interest in cross-cultural currents and comparative art theory. She is a contributing editor of Orientations Magazine. Her most recent curatorial projects include Simon Birch’s multi-media extravaganza, HOPE & GLORY (ongoing at ArtisTree Hong Kong), and the acclaimed exhibition ‘Looking for Antonio Mak’ (Hong Kong Museum of Art 2008-09), among others.

Philip Tinari

Philip Tinari

Philip TINARI

Philip Tinari is editor-in-chief of LEAP, a new bimonthly journal of contemporary Chinese art based in Beijing and published by the Modern Media Group. Since 2007, he has run the publishing imprint, editorial office, and translation studio Office for Discourse Engineering. Tinari is a contributing editor to Artforum and adjunct professor of art criticism at the China Central Academy of Fine Arts. He serves as China advisor to Art Basel and worked previously as academic consultant to the Chinese contemporary art department at Sotheby’s. He has written and lectured widely on contemporary art in China, for publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times Magazine, and Parkett. Recent projects include the book Hans Ulrich Obrist: The China Interviews (2009) and the exhibition The Hong Kong Seven, mounted by the Fondation Louis Vuitton at the Hong Kong Museum of Art last year. He holds an A.M. in East Asian studies from Harvard, a B.A. from Duke, and was Fulbright fellow at Peking University.

Dr Oei Hong Djien

Dr Oei Hong Djien

Dr OEI Hong Djien

Dr. Oei Hong Djien, born and based in Indonesia has been collecting art for nearly thirty years, focusing on modern and contemporary Indonesian art. The collection comprises about 1500 works. A fraction of the artworks is displayed in his private museum, known as OHD museum where he himself is the curator and which is available for public viewing. He was honorary adviser to the Singapore Art Museum in 2001 – 2005, served as member of the Singapore Art Museum Board in 2005 – 2009 and was a curator of Museum H. Widayat, Magelang , Indonesia in 1994 – 2009. A book about his collection has been published in 2004, titled: “Exploring Modern Indonesian Art. The collection of Dr Oei Hong Djien” by DR. Helena Spanjaard.

Karen Smith

Karen Smith

Karen SMITH

Karen Smith has been in Beijing since 1992 researching Chinese contemporary art. She is the author of Nine Lives: The Birth of Avant-Garde Art in New China and the forthcoming monograph on Ai Weiwei. Her curatorial work includes The Real Thing at Tate Liverpool, 2007; The Chinese, Kunstmuseum Wolfsberg , Germany , 2004; and Illumination; Ai Weiwei and Tibetan Plateau, Beijing Girls: Liu Xiaodong both at Mary Boone Gallery, 2008.

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Hong Kong hailed as art’s Promised Land by Art+Auction Magazine

Posted by artradar on April 2, 2010


HONG KONG ART MARKET

Sanyu, Lotus et poissons rouges, 1955

The state of the arts in Hong Kong are strong and flourishing, earning Hong Kong the high praise of being touted as Asia’s arts ‘promised land’ by Art +Auction Magazine in the March 2010 issue.

The article entitled ‘Promised Land’ describes the active art market in the city, which has recently expanded financially and creatively.

David Spalding writes for Art +Auction that:

‘Hong Kong is rising as a major art center, thanks to its thriving auction market and rapidly growing contemporary-art scene.’

‘The Hong Kong art scene has evolved rapidly, overcoming its regional myopia to become a key continentwide player and gaining prominence within the local cultural landscape.’

Auction Market

Hong Kong achieved the distinction as the 3rd largest auction market in the world in 2007, after the U.S. and U.K, and has maintained this positioning through 2009. A March 2010 article in The Economist titled How China Bucked the Trend: What Really Happened in 2009, states:

In 2009, when the global art market shrunk by more than a third to $43.5 billion, compared with $63.9 billion at its peak two years earlier, the Chinese art market bucked the trend. Sales in mainland China and Hong Kong reached a record high of $5.5 billion, up from $5 billion in 2008, boosting China’s share of the world art market that year to 14%, its highest share ever.

Indeed money freely flowed at Hong Kong’s various art auctions in late 2009, which set records and continually surpassed expectations. The following Fall 2009 Hong Kong auctions caught the attention of art world:

Zeng Fanzhi’s Untitled (Hospital Series), 1994

Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s October 6th sale of 20th-Century Chinese Art was estimated to generate $10.4 million USD in sales, but instead produced an impressive $14 million USD. This successful sale included Sanyu’s Lotus et poissons rouges, 1955,  which sold for $4.7 million, 31% higher than its greatest estimated price.  This is the artist’s 2nd highest auction price to date, and solely accounted for a third of the show’s total revenue.

The Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Paintings sale yielded $6.4 million, more than double its estimated yield and 76% more than the spring sale in this category.

The sale’s standout work was Indonesian painter Lee Man Fong’s Magnificent Horses, 1966, which was estimated to sell for approximately $200,000–$320,000 USD, but raked in an artist-record of $1 million USD.

Christie’s

Christie’s also experienced successful sales in November that produced $213 million USD over 5 days. A reported 47% of the buyers of contemporary Asian works were from mainland China, and favored pieces by more-established artists.

In the November 29th sale of Asian Contemporary Art and Chinese 20th-Century Art, Zeng Fanzhi’s Untitled (Hospital Series), 1994, surpassed its expected high of $1.5 million to attain $2.5 million. The November 30th Southeast Asian Modern and Contemporary sale featured Indonesian painter I Nyoman Masriadi’s Master Yoga, 2009, which also exceeded its high estimate of $130,000 to realize $467,102.

Socially active gallery scene, international flavor

Hong Kong has also earned the designation as Asia’s visual contemporary arts ‘promised land’ due to its vibrant and growing gallery scene, which features fine art not only from Asia, but the entire world. In addition, many of these socially responsible Hong Kong galleries have taken it as their mission to connect to and nurture the larger creative community. Hong Kong’s 10th annual ArtWalk, which was held on March 17th,  included 62 participating galleries that opened their doors to the public for this charity event that supported Hong Kong’s Society for Community Organization (SoCo).

Notable galleries featuring Asian artworks include:

Hanart TZ, founded in 1983 by the local critic and curator Johnson Chang Tsong-zung, has helped bring international exposure to mainland Chinese artists throughout the 1990s. This work has continued most recently with a solo exhibition of new paintings and mixed-media work by the young Fo Tan artist Lam Tung-pang (who is also represented in a concurrent group show at the Hong Kong Museum of Art through April 25).

The Osage Gallery focuses on East and Southeast Asian art, while 10 Chancery Lane Gallery holds exhibitions of Vietnamese and Cambodian contemporary art. The Thai gallery Tang Contemporary Art — which has become significant here since opening a space on Hollywood Road in 2008 — offers an eclectic mix. The artists represented in its booth at last year’s Hong Kong art fair included the Thai-Indian Navin Rawanchaikul, the Beijing-based Yan Lei and longtime Paris resident Wang Du.

Western art represented in Asia

There is also a growing local Hong Kong market for Western art, and numerous galleries have risen to meet this need.

The London gallery Ben Brown Fine Arts opened a Hong Kong space last November showing works by leading Western artists Gerhard RichterThomas Ruff and Jeff Wall, alongside those of established Asian artists like the Japanese Yayoi Kusama and the Calcutta-born, Brooklyn-based Rina Banerjee.

The Schoeni Art Gallery, which opened in 1993 with an exhibition of works by Chinese, Russian and Swiss artists, is boldly mixing things up, with the 2008 launch of Adapta, a collaboration with the U.K.-based Web magazine UKAdapta on projects involving urban and  graffiti artists like Banksy.

Additional galleries facilitating the introduction of Western art to Asia include: the Cat Street Gallery, Art Statements, and the Fabrik Gallery.

EW/KCE

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Posted in Art spaces, Auctions, Business of art, Galleries, Gallerists/dealers, Globalisation, Hong Kong, Market watch, Uncategorised | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Two internship opportunities at Art Radar Asia summer/autumn 2010

Posted by artradar on March 30, 2010


ART INTERNSHIP  WEB WRITING RESEARCH

Art Radar Asia is offering two internship opportunities this summer/autumn 2010.

Although we are not able to provide renumeration, we can promise that you will gain invaluable experience and make many useful, influential and interesting contacts.  As an intern, you will learn to conduct interviews, research art stories and write and edit posts.  There will also be opportunities to learn about publishing on the internet, social media and video production.

While our head office is based in Hong Kong we are used to working remotely via skype and email with our team therefore your location is not important.

We are particularly interested in applicants with one or more of the following skills: writing, editing, Asian language, native English, video production, social media, internet marketing, podcasting, wordpress, programming and web design.

The period of the internship is flexible with a minimum period of 6 weeks. We will consider both full-time and part-time applicants.

To apply please send you resume to kate@artradarasia.com. We look forward to hearing from you.

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Gallerist Salwa Zeidan explains mission of inaugural Abu Dhabi Sculpture Symposium – interview

Posted by artradar on March 13, 2010


UNITED ARAB EMIRATES SCULPTURE SYMPOSIUM

Salwa Zeidan, gallerist and an organiser of the inaugural Abu Dhabi International Sculpture Symposium (ADISS),  (25 February to 7 April 2010 at Zayed University) talks to Art Radar about the mission of ADISS, government sponsorship of the arts and her favourite Emirati sculptor.

Her gallery, the Salwa Zeidan Gallery. has collaborated with Zayed University to bring ADISS to Abu Dhabi. Its theme is “Bridging Societies Through the Language of Art,” and involves bringing specially commissioned sculpture to the city as well as opening a dialogue about public art in Abu Dhabi.

Billy Lee, EOS 2004

Billy Lee, EOS 2004

What is the mission of ADISS?

Our mission is mainly to make art available and accessible to everyone so that ordinary people from all walks of life can enjoy a piece of art and interact with it. We also want to create an artistic atmosphere in Abu Dhabi for residents and visitors to enjoy. As beautiful and peaceful as it is, Abu Dhabi is missing public art in its streets and roundabouts and so I believe we came at the right time to compliment the city with these monumental pieces of art.

Has its mission changed since its conception?

No. However, it became more interesting.. to see how many people are so excited about seeing the sculptures in the streets.

Gregor Kregar, Twisting the Void

Gregor Kregar, Twisting the Void

How is ADISS different from other art-related international symposiums?

Well it is taking place in Abu Dhabi, a city known for its high-quality events but the most significant difference is that it is under the patronage of the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and is being organized by major entities such as Zayed University and the Municipality – all of these factors have elevated the project to a national scale.

How will ADISS impact the local art scene?

It is very important to see art every day in our lives, and interact with it til it becomes a permanent part of our lives. Events such as ADISS have the power to enrich the art scene as a whole by making it more common and this is very important for a contemporary country such as Abu Dhabi.

What about its global impact?

If we look around the world, we see the economy is not at its best, and this situation is reflecting on the art scene in general, so it is in some areas getting from bad to worse for artists. Abu Dhabi is extending so much attention towards art through Art Abu Dhabi, ADISS and other cultural initiatives by ADACH (Abu Dhabi Authority for Culture and Heritage) and TDIC (Tourism Development and Investment Company), and through future projects that are being developed such as Saadiyat (the Art district) – this is very encouraging for artists from all over the world as it places art at the forefront of sociological evolution. Such progress is very promising for artists from all walks of life including myself.

Jo Kley, Helix Anröchter

Jo Kley, Helix Anröchter

Do you have a favorite piece being created for ADISS? If so, why?

I like most of the pieces being created, the most important thing is that they are being created in Abu Dhabi and for Abu Dhabi the city that I love, and these pieces are going to stay, the thought that we are creating a new reality for this city is great. When I see how these blocks are being transformed into wonderful sculptures everyday and how the artists are so happy to be here to create and leave their work on this land, I feel a great sense of accomplishment. We are about to change the face of Abu Dhabi with all these great artworks!

How does the general population in Abu Dhabi view art, and will their perceptions change after ADISS?

I’m sure it is going to help the change, and eventually their perception about art will change since living with art on a daily basis is bound to change their way of thinking about art in general no matter what the current state of mind may be.

Is public art the best way for people to include art in their everyday lives?

I guess so, it broadens their horizons to a new reality that will bring forth new questions and new answers which will eventually impact their evolution positively.

Masahiro, Lotus

Masahiro, Lotus

The Abu Dhabi art scene is thriving? Is there anything you would like to change? Why? Regarding the Abu Dhabi art scene, do you have any favorite local artists?

Hassan Sharif is my favorate Emirati artist… He is also one of the Symposium artists working on a great piece called “step” which is going to be 6 meters high. Hassan was the first Emirati national to pursue a career as an artist in the UAE; he has and continues to be one of the most significant influences on the local art scene. There are a few young local artists that I like as well, whom I believe have lots of potential to advance and grow. As a gallerist I have made it my mission to find such talents, nurture them, offer them a place to exhibit their works and give them the right advice to help them realize their full abilities.

I believe local artists will advance much more once the art projects in Abu Dhabi are fully realized and once they have the chance to see and live with works by some of the most influencial artists of our time. They will definitely develop their talents even more and are keen to do so… I see them working very hard at developing themselves and have all the tools they need at their finger tips so why not? I’m very optimistic about the local art scene and find that all the support they are receiving from their rulers and their governments is bound to strenghten their resolve even further and enable them to acquire their place on the international art arena.

Petre Petrov, Guatemala

Petre Petrov, Guatemala

Is there any particular news or information you’d like to share with our readers?

Yes I would like them to come and visit this wonderful City that is giving so much attention to art, culture and music, when the whole world is so busy with other matters and thus taking art for granted. Here art has been taken to another dimension and is becoming part of its identity. It is wonderful to see the government focusing on the cultural aspect of the country to make cultural events and artifacts more accessible to the entire community. I wish all the governments of the world paid as much attention to culture, perhaps there will be no more wars!

ADISS lecture: What is Public Art?

ADISS lecture: What is Public Art?

On 14 March 2010, there will be a public art discussion at Zayed University. Hassan Sharif from UAE, Caroline Ramersdorfer from Austria, Ehab El Laban from Egypt, Billy Lee from United Kingdom and Jon Barlow Hudson from USA will talk about the Public Art, its effect and its importance within the premises of Abu Dhabi at the scheduled lecture programme. Other ADISS events can be found here.

Zayed University - Location Map

AL

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Posted in Abu Dhabi, Events, Interviews, Sculpture, UAE, Uncategorised | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

What is street art? Top 5 street artists in the art world- Part II

Posted by artradar on March 10, 2010


STREET ART CULTURE

As street art goes mainstream in Asia, Art Radar takes a look at its roots.

Modern graffiti art originated as an underworld activity and coincided with the hip hop movement in the late 1960’s and early 70’s in New York City [Associated Content], but many artists who started as ‘taggers’ have been recognized by the art world and achieved commercial success. This post will provide an outline of the humble beginnings of street art culture and the artists who have emerged from this culture and into the international art scene.

The common unsanctioned art visible in urban areas is the work of graffiti ‘writers’, who compete for recognition and respect (‘fame’) by having the most pervasive street art in a community. Each artist has his or her own graffiti name (‘tag’), which is creatively written as a signature or autograph and repeated throughout an area. Walls within an area that are sites for expressions of an artist’s or group’s dominance are known as ‘Walls of Fame.’

A strict hierarchy, visible through imagery

Although the graffiti art community may seem unstructured, it adheres to a strict hierarchy among its writers. The most visible or skilled artists are known as ‘kings’, and iconography of crowns within their work is a reference to the writer’s status. Lesser artists can only gain status by impressing a ‘king’.

Unfortunately, part of the reason these writers create graffiti is because it is illicit, and it helps the artist gain notoriety. Lady Pink, a socially conscious veteran street artist whose work is on display at The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Queens Museum of Art, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, the Museum of the City of New York, says:

“You can’t give them a legal wall. They’re not interested. They’re more interested in the aspect of breaking the law, being vandals and being rebellious. They don’t have the skills for it or the desire to paint something in the daytime.” [Queens Tribune]

From street to chic

In past years street art has progressed beyond its gang related origins and is now appreciated among the highest contemporary art, with a matching price tag. Ralph Taylor of Sotheby’s, who has organized contemporary street art sales for auction in London, says:

“There is a natural progression from the young artists collected by Charles Saatchi in the 1990s to the street artists of today. People used to be looking for the next Damien Hirst; now they are after the next Banksy.” [Telegraph]

The artist Banksy, whose identity is kept secret for fear of the legal consequences for his art, is perhaps the best known street artist today. Banksy’s You Told That Joke Twice surpassed price estimates to sell for $266,000 at Christie’s on February 11, 2010, in a sale among pieces by Andy Warhol and Anish Kapoor. Another piece by Banksy, titled I Fought the Law is scheduled for auction at Christie’s on March 23, 2010, with an estimated price of $15,020-$22,530. Another two works by Banksy, titled Bomb Hugger and Armoured Car, sold at Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Day Sale on February 11, 2010, selling for $88,396 and $73,976, respectively.

Works by the American graffiti artist Barry Mcgee, also known as ‘Ray Fong’ and ‘Twist’ (and variations of the word twist, including Twister and Twisty) have also frequented  the Christie’s auction, commanding prices up to $113,525.

Art Radar’s Top 5 Street Artists who have achieved success in the art world

Banksy – Possibly the best known street artist and an icon of the street art movement. He began his career creating street artworks in and around London, but has been legitimately accepted into the higher realms of the art world. He has been a regular at art auctions fetching high prices, and is presented with the most exclusive contemporary artists at gallery shows. Banksy will be on display in Hong Kong at Fabrick Contemporary Art in the company of artists Damien Hirst, Francis Bacon, and Gilbert and George, in The Great British Show, running Feb 25- March 25, 2010.

Banksy’s Asian museum exhibition debut was the show ‘Love Art 08‘, which ran April 30-May 13, 2008 at the Hong Kong Art Center, and featured other contemporary and pop art heavy weights like Damien Hirst and Robert Indiana.

He has also recently completed a film titled Exit Through the Gift Shop, which is touted to be a ‘street art disaster movie’, which debuted at the Sundance Film Festival on Jan 24, 2010.

Here you can view some works on display at the Bristol Museum’s Banksy Exhibition 2009.


Shepard Fairey–  Educated over 20 years ago at the Rhode Island School of Design, he began his career making guerilla street art in Los Angeles, but has since expanded his concept, which revolves around the image of Andre the Giant, into an entire product line branded  ‘OBEY’. Canvas artworks have also been developed from this iconography, including his Peace Goddess, which sold at Sotheby’s for $80,500 in the company of works by Banksy and Andy Warhol. His first museum exhibition, titled Supply and Demand, was at the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art, from Febuary 16-August 16, 2009, and included his iconic Obama Poster, which now hangs in the United State’s National Portrait Gallery.

See Shepard Fairey explain why he created the Obama Hope poster and his OBEY campaign here:


Adam Neate– This UK graffiti artist has been recognized by the London National Gallery, the Tate, and the London National Portrait Gallery. He has been shown by the Elms Lesters Gallery in London, and in 2007 his painting Suicide Bomber sold for £78,500 at Sotheby’s. On November 14, 2008, in an event The London Show, he and helpers left 1,000 prints, worth a total of £1 million, around London streets for anyone to pick up and keep. He says: “The whole concept of the free art thing was challenging the notion of art as a commodity and its worth in society. Now I’m taking that to another level, testing the viability of separating art from commerce.” [Skyarts]

Adam’s Neate’s Asian debut was at the Schoeni Gallery in Hong Kong on June 19-July 18, 2009.

See Adam Neate speak on his London Show:


Swoon, whose real name is Caledonia ‘Callie’ Currry, is a New York City street artist, and has been recognized by the P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Art Basel Miami, MoMA, and the Brooklyn Museum.  She crashed the 2009 Venice Biennale with a 30-person ‘Swimming Cities’ performance project, titled The Clutches of Cuckoo. She and her ‘pirate’ crew sailed from Slovenia to dock off the Grand Canal of Certosa Island in a ship made of New York City garbage, to make an extraordinary entrance.

See Swoon speak on her works at the MoMA in a two part interview series:


Barry McGee, also known as Ray Fong, Twist, or Twisty, is a San Francisco, California based street artist and cult figure whose work was included in the Venice Biennale in 2001, and the 2009-2010 Biennale de Lyon, France. He has been exhibited at the Watari-um Museum in Tokyo, the 2008 Carnegie International, the Rose Art Museum in Waltham, Maryland, and the BALTIC Centre in UK. His work has also sold at Christie’s, commanding high prices.

See some of his work in this interview video with Art 21 for PBS.

EW/KCE

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Fotan 2010 – a growing cluster of art studios in Hong Kong

Posted by artradar on February 9, 2010


HONG KONG ART STUDIOS

Fo Tan is a place that you might not be able to name straight away when speaking of Hong Kong’s local art. However, this fading industrial district is home to more than 50 art studios and 180 artists. Each year in January many of Fo Tan’s artists invite outsiders into their studios to show their work as well as to exchange ideas and dialogue.

Fotanian Open Studio Programme 2010  which showcases artwork of a multitude of media, including paintings, sculptures, ceramics, mixed media, printmaking, installations, photographic and video works, is the eighth incarnation of the event.

This year CNNGo takes a peek inside some of the studios and interviews the artists about their experience of Fotan.

Chow Chun Fai at Studio 1023: “Fotanian follows no rules. It’s a natural process. People come and go. It renews itself.”

Homan Ho at G16: “Fotanian is coming together to be able to dream together, even if we still need that day job.”

Sculpture and furniture designer Homan Ho is sitting in front of the bookshelf he made for G16, the unofficial café of this year’s Fotanian event.

Posted in Chinese, Chow Chun Fai, Emerging artists, Events, Fairs, Fotanian, Gallery shows, Hong Kong, Hong Kong Artists, Painting, Uncategorised | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Art industry elite meet at inaugural Abu Dhabi Art fair

Posted by artradar on December 21, 2009


ART FAIRS

The inaugural Abu Dhabi Art fair opened to much fanfare on November 19th. The government-run Tourism Development and Investment Company (TDIC) organized the fair, along with the area’s new cultural district on Saadiyat Island.

The project features the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi by architect Frank Gehry, the Louvre Abu Dhabi by architect Jean Nouvel, the Performing Arts Centre by architect Zaha Hadid, the Maritime Museum by architect Tadao Ando, and the Sheikh Zayed National Museum by architect Foster + Partners Ltd.

In attendance at the event were big time players from the Western art world, including London’s White Cube, New York’s Acquavella Galleries, and Dubai’s Third Line and B21. Megacollector François Pinault along with Jeff Koons were in attendance as special patrons.

Jeff Koons on left, François Pinault on right.

According to ArtForum who covered the event, Abu Dhabi Art was really two fairs under one roof. On the one hand, there was a slew of young galleries from places like Bangalore, Damascus, and Dubai, showing works that ranged from calligraphic kitsch to more promising endeavors. The other fair was a higher-stakes arena, featuring major New York and European dealers.

Dealer Iwan Wirth, from Hauser & Wirth, in front of a large Louise Bourgeois spider

Hauser & Wirth brought a large Louise Bourgeois spider sculpture and Subodh Gupta skull, while White Cube offered sparkling paintings by Hirst. Tony Shafrazi hung his ’80s-themed stand with Basquiats, Warhols, and Harings. A consortium of seven dealers, including L&M Arts, Malingue, and Louis Carre & Cie, combined forces with Picassos and Légers.

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Posted in Abu Dhabi, Art districts, Fairs, Francois Pinault, Uncategorised | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »