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Posts Tagged ‘Chinese ink’

How is Chinese ink painting explored in contemporary art? RedBox Review in discussion with Liang Quan

Posted by artradar on October 7, 2010


CHINESE INK CHINESE ARTISTS ARTIST INTERVIEWS

In a conversation with Chinese-based art blog RedBox Review the artist Liang Quan (b. 1948), living and working in Shenzhen, China, explains how ink painting is used in contemporary art and how this exploration continues to follow the philosophy of traditional Chinese painting.

Liang Quan is considered as one of the pioneers of contemporary ink painting.

“Ink painting”, also known as “wash painting”, was developed in China during the Tang Dynasty. Ink painting or shui-mo hua in Chinese (水墨畫) is composed of water,  shui and Chinese ink, mo. In Western art, using similar techniques, it is known as drawings.

 

Liang Quan, "Tea Stain No3", 2008, ink and paper, 63.8x48cm

Liang Quan, 'Tea Stain No. 3', 2008, ink and paper, 63.8x48 cm.

 

In this conversation Liang Quan highlights to RedBox the difference between ink painting and ink art:

The exploration of using ink and referring to the tradition of Chinese painting is part of a greater narrative to define a cultural identity.

American contemporary artists like Brice Marden and Cy Twombly inspired Liang Quan while he was living and working abroad. On top of using ink painting and water, Liang incorporates paper into his works.

Liang’s ink painting seems abstract but in reality he follows the philosophy of this art. He aims to capture the soul of the subject rather that trying to reproduce the exact appearance of it. As he relates to RedBox,

My use of collage, combining strips of ink and/or tea stained paper, may seem abstract to the unknowing eye, and without direct correlation to a depiction of reality. But my works, collages, are actually diagrams of traditional Chinese landscape paintings and the Chinese still life painting genre of birds and flowers.

 

Interesting difference between ink painting in West and East: perspective

Having explored ink painting in Western art, Liang Quan observed a major difference between it and Chinese landscape painting: multiple points of perspective are used where Western painting uses only one or two.  As he relates to RedBox,

To view a Chinese painting, one’s eye usually follows the flow of water from the bottom of the mountains as it meanders farther into the hills and up the composition of the painting.

Following this philosophy and adding paper strips and color makes Liang’s painting abstract.

After exploring the multiple points of perspective in Chinese landscape painting, Liang Quan combined this concept with the ideals of Nan Pai, also known as Southern School. As said in the RedBox article,

By addressing the theme of Chinese tradition, he is distinguished from his contemporaries choosing to use painting as a depiction of or social response to modern society.

SB/KN/KCE

Related Topics: Chinese artists, definitions, ink

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Posted in Artist Nationality, Calligraphy, China, Chinese, Classic/Contemporary, Collage, Drawing, Ink, Interviews, Landscape, Painting, Shenzhen, Styles, Themes and subjects, Trends | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Is ink the next thing? Evidence mounts of growing interest in Chinese ink painting – Redbox

Posted by artradar on April 27, 2009


 

 

Wenda Gu, Ink not Ink at Drexel Uni, US

Wenda Gu, Ink not Ink at Drexel Uni, US

CHINESE INK

 

 

 

The international debut of contemporary ink painting from China already follows the wake of enthusiasm for Chinese contemporary art says the must-read Beijing-based Chinese art news site Redbox.

Wenda Gu, untitled installation, multi-racial human hair 1994-5

Wenda Gu, untitled installation, multi-racial human hair 1994-5

Speculations of an energetic revival of ink painting have been up in the air, and it is certainly not an coincidence that these prestigious museums all set foot in the creation of dialogues between Chinese and overseas scholars on the topic of contemporary Chinese ink painting.

Redbox notes the following current and upcoming exhibitions and alliances. 

  • “‘Ink not Ink”  – a traveling survey exhibition of 80 works in various media by 40 artists aims to show Chinese artists continuing exploration of Chinese traditional ink painting in a contemporary context. The show featuring Wenda Gu premiered in  Shenzhen art museum in South China and then went to Today Art Museum in Beijing before going to the Drexel University in the US . It is planned to take the show on to Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic.

See installation of Wendu Gu work in Ink not Ink exhibition on video

See interview with Wenda Gu on video

See gallery of Ink not Ink images by following artists: Wenda Gu, Wei Qingji, Wang Jiawei, Yan Yinhong, Lin Tianmiao, Yang Guoxin, Peng Wei, Dai Guangyu, Wang Tiande, Wei Qingje

Lin Tianmiao

Lin Tianmiao

  • the 2008 “The Transforming Marks of Ink” show in Berlin and Dresden, Germany (organized by the National Art Museum of China),

 

  • the strong focus on the ink medium in the current “Outside IN” exhibition at the Princeton University Museum of Art,

 

  • as well as the Cohen collection of works on paper in “Post-Mao Dreaming” at Smith College Museum

 

  • The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has commissioned ten Chinese artists to create a work on paper inspired by a piece in the MFA collection, titled “Fresh Ink: Ten Takes on Chinese Tradition” slated for late 2010.

 

  • And following “Re-Boot: Third Chengdu Biennale” in 2007, which presented a gamut of contemporary works in all media that addressed the topic of guohua (national painting) or shuimo hua (ink painting), the Metropolitan Museum has consulted with esteemed curator and scholar Shen Kuiyi to organize a large group show for Spring 2011.

To explore this story further, click over to  Redbox which has produced a thorough list of links for the above list.

You can also find  more evidence of growing international interest in Chinese ink art in our related posts section below:

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