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Posts Tagged ‘Ju Ming’

A Sunday at Art Taipei – gallery comments, Australian media art, Pearl Lam

Posted by artradar on August 26, 2010


ART FAIRS TAIWANESE ART EVENTS INTERNATIONAL ART ASIAN CONTEMPORARY ART

Art Radar presents a Sunday at Art Taipei 2010 in nine images accompanied by quotes from Korean gallery director Jung Yong Lee and the refreshingly honest Pearl Lam, panel members at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum, five gallerists presenting their thoughts on the fair, and Australian new media artist Josephine Starrs who spoke at the one of the Art Taipei 2010 Weekend Art Lectures.

Pearl Lam, Director of Contrasts Gallery, and Jung Yong Lee, Director of Gana Art, speaking at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Pearl Lam, Director of Contrasts Gallery, and Jung Yong Lee, Director of Gana Art, speaking at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Pearl Lam, Director, Contrasts Gallery, as heard at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum conversation, Asia International Galleries: The Next Movement: “When the price goes up very high it goes down very fast. It happens to design and it happens to contemporary art. So in the last six months people have been very careful and very cautious about contemporary art, but in blue chip artworks like the post-war or the impressionist it is just going up. And there are a lot of private sales, a lot of secondary market sales. So most of the galleries are actually making money from the secondary market.

Collectors are actually referring to the auction prices as a reference and a lot of young collectors need the auction to validate the price. But I have my thoughts about auctions because auction prices, for me, are never accurate unless they are a really high price like 20, 30, 40 million USD 1. Because it’s very easy; you can put a painting in an auction, we can get all our friends sticking our hands up, push the price up…. So my way of seeing things … most of the auction houses are making money from private clients.”

Joanna Li, Fish Art Center, beside Huang Poren's stainless steel sculpture 'What the heck!'. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Joanna Li, Fish Art Center, beside Huang Poren's stainless steel sculpture 'What the heck!'. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Joanna Li, Fish Art Center: “This is my fifth time at Art Taipei. In the past two years we have brought brand new artworks [to the fair] and all the artists are Taiwanese. They’re still young, around 26 years old. We also have modern artists…. We have sculptures, oil paintings. We have sold more medium priced artworks…. [The collectors are] from Taiwan, a few customers are from Hong Kong and China.”

Outside Art Taipei 2010's main exhibition hall. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Outside Art Taipei 2010's main exhibition hall. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Mizuma Sueo, Director, Mizuma Art Gallery (Tokyo, Beijing): “This is our second time at Art Taipei. Today’s audience, there are so many people … but the last three days a little less. It’s a little less than last year. Sales are stable. We have sold some [works by] young Japanese artists and Chinese artists, but we have sold only one piece to a Taiwanese collector. The other pieces were sold to a Korean collector, Hong Kong and Japan. The audience is mainly Asian.”

Inside Art Taipei 2010's main exhibition hall. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Inside Art Taipei 2010's main exhibition hall. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Jung Yong Lee, Director, Gana Art, as heard at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum conversation, Asia International Galleries: The Next Movement: “When the crisis came we had a very hard time,… I’m from a commercial gallery and we have to sell a lot of artwork to maintain our operation. But when the crisis came there were literally no sales for at least six months to over a year. So what we ended up doing was, since we couldn’t find a client who was investing, who was collecting art for their collections, finding clients who were companies and local governments who had a lot of promotional money to spend. We did consulting for companies. We made outdoor sculptures, we decorated lobbies for hotels, the façades of buildings; we did a lot of projects like that. And we also helped to make art parks or small private museums.”

Chen Liu, 'Blue Blossom Standing above the sea', 2010, oil on canvas, 200 x 140 cm. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Chen Liu, 'Blue Blossom Standing above the sea', 2010, oil on canvas, 200 x 140 cm. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Junghwa Ryu, Curator, Arario Gallery (Cheonan, Beijing, Seoul, New York): “Art Taipei 2010 is more organised than the last one. Many visitors are interested in new contemporary art and we feel that the Taipei government has supported the fair well with their policy of focusing on an international base. However, the results for the sales are … not good as of now. Hanna Kim (1981, Korea) and Osang Gwon (1973, Korea) have been paid much attention. I guess in general the Taiwanese love a more light and cozy style than heavy and serious.… They are sensitive to trends and new skills.”

Sculptures by Taiwanese artist Ju Ming. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Sculptures by Taiwanese artist Ju Ming. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

James Hsu and Elise Chen, Ping Art Space (Taipei): “This is our third time here. Obviously it’s more international this year because there are more galleries participating in this art fair and we have collectors from Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia. In the past we would mainly have Taiwanese collectors…. Five years ago there might be just one Japanese gallery here but after this year there is this reputation in Japan that there is a good market in Taiwan. So this year there are 26 galleries from Japan. Also, in Taiwan, we have this history of collecting contemporary art for 20 years [and] after this period of time you can see that the market is getting better and better. Last year the economic crisis affected the market a lot and so this is like a rebound.”

Digital print by Australian media artists Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski, part of their 'Downsteam' installation, as exhibited at Art Taipei 2010. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Digital print by Australian media artists Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski, part of their 'Downstream' installation, as exhibited at Art Taipei 2010. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Josephine Starrs, as heard at the weekend art lecture, Recent and emerging trends in Australian media art: “This is some of the work that we are exhibiting here at Art Taipei in the <Encoded> exhibition. ‘Downstream’ explores new ways of representing the relationship between nature and culture. We are imbedding poetic text into [satellite] images of landscapes at particular risk from climate change. The work focusses on the degradation of the Murray-Darling, the largest river system in Australia, but it could be any river system in the world that is in danger from changes in climate.

We have changed the satellite imagery to write text in the landscape imagery, as if the landscape is sending us messages. When we started looking at this landscape imagery we noticed that the river almost looked like writing already. So we decided to change the river and embed this text from a famous Australian poem. The words say, ‘and the river was dust’.”

Shen Bo-Cheng's 'Read- Lleine Eschichte Der Photographie (2010), exhibited as part of Art Taipei's MADE in TAIWAN - Young Artist Discovery event. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Shen Bo-Cheng's 'Read- Lleine Eschichte Der Photographie' (2010), exhibited as part of Art Taipei's MADE in TAIWAN - Young Artist Discovery event. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

E.D.Lee Gallery Co., Ltd (Taipei): “We have been to Art Taipei twice. This year it is more international, a lot of foreign galleries have joined us here and there are a lot more people. We have sold many works today. This year all of our artists are from Taiwan. Almost all of our collectors are Taiwanese but we also have collectors from Japan and Korea.”

Yan Chao, 'The Width of the Strait', 2009, mixed media on canvas, 150 x 180 cm. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

Yan Chao, 'The Width of the Strait', 2009, mixed media on canvas, 150 x 180 cm. Image property of Art Radar Asia.

We hope to bring you more on Art Taipei 2010 in the coming weeks, including an overview of what was said at the 2010 Art Taipei Forum sessions and public art lectures we attended.

KN

Related Topics: art fairs, collectors, business of art, gallerists/dealers

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Young Taiwanese unable to name leading local artists, survey reports

Posted by artradar on May 19, 2010


TAIWANESE ARTS SURVEY RESULTS

As reported in a recent article by Radio Taiwan International, a survey conducted by the King Car Education Foundation has revealed that a large majority of Taiwanese high school and university students are unable to name even one prominent Taiwanese artist.

Renowned Taiwanese sculptor Ju Ming

Renowned Taiwanese sculptor Ju Ming

The article goes on to say:

The purpose of the poll was to measure an awareness of, and interest in the arts, and to look at how much young people participate in arts-related activities.

When asked to name “three well-known Taiwanese artists”, 70.85 percent of respondents could not think of even one name. Of those who were able to name an artist, the most popular responses included Cloud Gate Dance Theatre founder Lin Hwai-min, sculptor Ju Ming and painter Shiy De-jinn.

The article also notes that the survey reported a low participation rate in local art events and activities for Taiwanese students.

Read the full story here.


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Three sculptors who influenced the Taiwanese art landscape: Yang Ying-feng, Ju Ming and Pu Hao-ming

Posted by artradar on February 9, 2010


PUSHING TAIWANESE SCULPTURE INTO THE INTERNATIONAL SPOTLIGHT

A recent article published in Taiwan News profiles three highly influential Taiwanese sculptors, old generation artists Yang Ying-feng and Ju Ming, and contemporary craftsman Pu Hao-ming.

These sculptors have contributed much to art in Taiwan and helped to advance it from “carvings of religious figures and decorative pieces for temples” that once dominated the cultural output of Taiwan prior to the 1920s.

Taiwanese sculptor Ju Ming coloring a piece in his Living World Series

Yang Ying-feng

This internationally renowned sculptor was born in Yilan, Taiwan, in 1926 and decided to become an artist early in his life. In 1943, he studied architecture in Japan at the Tokyo Fine Arts School.

While in Japan, he was also granted the opportunity to study under Asakura Fumio, a master of Japanese modern sculpture. It was in Japan that he began to discover his distinct style of lifescape sculpture “which emphasises the harmony of humanity, environment and art.”

He won his first award in 1953 for his piece Sudden Rain. A Buddhist sculpture entitled Higher When You Look Up was exhibited at the 1956 Sao Paulo Art Biennial and collected by the Taiwanese National Museum of History. It was around this time he began to use stainless steel in his work.

He studied modern sculpture in Italy and in 1970 exhibited at the Expo’70 in Japan.

Yang Ying-feng died in Taiwan in 1997.

Little Flying Phoenix, Yang Ying-feng

Ju Ming

Living artist Ju Ming was born in Miaoli County, Taiwan, in 1938. Inspired by Yang Ying-feng, he “is considered a legend of the history of modern Taiwan art.”

He learned the art of woodcarving at 15, studying under Lee Chin-chuan, a master craftsman renovating a temple near his home.

Ju’s artistic ambitions began to solidify when he approached sculptor Yang Yu-yu with two pieces of his early sculptural work, Portrait of My Mother and A Girl Playing in the Sand. Yang took him on as his student. It was by studying under Yang that Ju “developed his own idea that art is cultivation through practice.”

Ju Ming’s first solo exhibition was held in 1977 at the National Museum of History in Taiwan. After this came his two major works: Taichi Series, which he showed at his first overseas exhibition at the Tokyo Central Art Museum in 1977, and Living World Series, which was developed in the 1980s during travel to America.

Ju Ming achieved international success during the eighties and nineties: “his creations have successfully transformed him from a traditional craftsman and artist into a master sculptor at home and abroad.” Most recently, he received an honory doctorate of art from Fu-jen Catholic University.

There is a sculpture museum, Juming Museum, located in Taipei, Taiwan, that is dedicated to the showing of Ju Ming’s work.

Single Whip, Taichi Series, Ju Ming

Pu Hao-ming

Born in Chiayi City, Taiwan, in 1944, Pu Hao-ming is the son of Pu Tien-sheng, “one of the most influential scupltors in the history of Taiwan art.” His father privately tutored him until he entered the Chinese Cultural University in 1963.

Pu travelled and studied in Europe from 1980 to 1983 where his works (as well as his father’s) were selected for numerous Salon Exhibitions in Paris.

He returned to Taiwan and his most celebrated works from 1983 to 1995, including Female Rider, Fu Hsi Shih and Flower of Life, were collected by the Taipei Fine Arts Museum and the Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts.

Fu Hsi Shih, 1980, Pu Hao-ming

This is a summary of Pioneers of a new age in Taiwan art (Yali Chen, Taiwan News)

KN/KCE

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