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Posts Tagged ‘spain’

‘A Red Carpet’ for Singapore’s Digital Nights Showcase, courtesy artist Tom Carr

Posted by artradar on September 7, 2010


DIGITAL ART SINGAPORE PUBLIC ART

Racing fever hits Singapore as the city prepares to host the Singapore Grand Prix from 17 to 26 September. And with the expectant influx of tourists, preparations are in full swing for the Digital Nights Showcase (DNS). The festival entails interactive new and digital artworks that will be displayed simultaneously with the Grand Prix for ten nights, allowing locals and tourists to enjoy works by internationally acclaimed European artists.

The DNS will feature at the Singapore Arts Museum and Orchard Road, Singapore’s high fashion street and as part of this, artist Tom Carr is getting ready to present his work for the first time in Asia. DNS Project Manager, Frederic Chambon says of the festival,

“Digital Nights will present some of the best works of world-renowned French and European artists in the digital arts field. Visitors of all ages and backgrounds will be able to interact with the artworks, designed to envelop the senses through stimulating visual and digital technology.”

A preparatory drawing for Tom Carr's 'A Red Carpet for Orchard Road' (detail).

A preparatory drawing for Tom Carr's 'A Red Carpet for Orchard Road' (detail). Image courtesy of the artist.

Tom Carr, one of a handful of contemporary European artists chosen to present at the DNS, will be showing A Red Carpet for Orchard Road. The artwork projects a red carpet onto the street, inviting everyone to walk on the digital projection for their moment of VIP experience. Unlike a real red carpet, the projections will not be static. Carr’s audience can play with shadows and lights, and become a part of the installation by moving around with the projection. A euphemism for celebrityhood, A Red Carpet invokes celebrity notions of beauty and fame; the location of Carr’s enterprise, Orchard Road, is also Singapore’s go-to street for celebrity fashion.

Carrʼs light projections have been shown at museums such as the Musée dʼArt Moderne de Céret in France, the Science Museum in Barcelona, Spain and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid, Spain. Carr lives and works in Sant Quirze del Valles, Spain. The dual concepts of space and time appear often in his works – most so with his famous installation for the Miro Foundation. His first project in Singapore is being facilitated by Bartha & Senarclens, Partners. Frederic de Senarclens from this firm says,

We are very excited to introduce a work of art by Tom Carr to the Singapore public. Public accessibility of new media and digital art in Singapore has increased tremendously in recent years, a demonstration of the governmentʼs recognition of the long-term implications of enhanced urban living through exposure to art and culture.

Digital Nights is being held from 17-26 September, 2010 in Singapore.
AM/KN/HH
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Posted in Art spaces, Artist Nationality, Electronic art, European, Festival, Installation, Interactive art, Laser, Light, Museum shows, New Media, Open air, Participatory, Public art, Singapore | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

55 Days in Valencia. An Encounter with Chinese Art at Instituto Valenciano de Art Moderno

Posted by artradar on May 31, 2008


SURVEY CHINESE ART 
The exhibition 55 día en Valencia. Encuentro de arte chino (55 Days in Valencia. An Encounter with Chinese Art), a title chosen in reference to Nicholas Ray’s film 55 Days in Peking, offers a broad overview of the contemporary artistic manifestations that are being produced in the Asian country and permits Western spectators to take a look at the rich, complex Oriental culture.
This exhibition, sponsored by Ferrobús, comprises a total of 448 works arranged in three spaces, two located at the IVAM: the Sala de la Muralla, where the documentary photographs and a pictorial diary made up of 365 pictures are displayed, and Gallery 8, where installations and videos are shown. The third part of the exhibition, at the Museo de la Ciudad, comprises paintings, conceptual photography and a sculpture. 

The catalogue published for the exhibition reproduces the works displayed and includes texts by the curators of the exhibition, Rafael Sierra, a journalist and art critic, Zuo Jing, art director of the Iberia Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing, and Consuelo Císcar, director of the IVAM.

Contemporary Chinese art began to develop in the late seventies, at the beginning of the Deng Xiaoping era (1979-1992). The eighties was a period of incubation for this art, a period that, like many new ideas, participated in the nation’s Enlightened Movement and made its own contribution to it. The 1989 Contemporary Chinese Art Exhibition was the closing ceremony of an era of contemporary Chinese art, which underwent profound changes in the second half of the nineteen nineties. The success of the Shanghai Biennale in 2000, in the post-Deng period (1997-), marked the recognition of contemporary Chinese art by official ideology. Chinese art today is even more complex and more diversified, partly as a result of the influence of market economy.

Today’s art in China has also undergone a spectacular transition since the year 2000. In simple terms, the centre of attention is no longer public history but the history of individuals, and reveals the presence of metaphysical thought reflected in the works.

The painting section of the exhibition includes two extensive series that represent very well the new trends in Chinese art: Beyond Painting and China 2006, by Zong Biao and Sun Jianchun, respectively. The first series comprises a large-format central piece and twelve separate paintings, paintings within paintings that produce a polyphonic visual effect. The second is a conceptual work made up of 365 oil paintings (one for each day of 2006), which reproduce journalistic photographs taken from the Internet and referring to an event that happened somewhere in the country. Thus the work constitutes a sort of graphic chronicle of that year. The exhibition also includes videos by important Chinese artists.

The exhibition has more photographs than anything else, a total of 65 pieces. The documentary photograph section included in 55 días en Valencia illustrates the changes that have taken place in political and social life in the recent history of China, and gives an account of the fast development of the country until the present day. The exhibition also includes a large representation of the conceptual photography that China has been producing since the nineties.

Today more and more European and American museums are interested in Asian art, and specifically the art of China, which has taken the place of Japan at the forefront of Asia in the international art market. To divulge this phenomenon, the IVAM has scheduled three exhibitions focused on Chinese art.

The first one, The Real Thing: arte contemporáneo de China (The Real Thing: Contemporary Art from China), was organised jointly with the Tate Liverpool, and was on show last April.

55 días en Valencia (55 Days in Valencia) is the second exhibition of Chinese art held this year and is the first exhibition of Chinese art organised entirely by a Spanish museum.

The third, Tinta y papel contemporáneos (Contemporary Ink & Paper), will open on 29th July, and will show the combination of contemporary art and the tradition of an age-old culture, which for centuries has used ink and paper for artistic expression.
Source: artdaily.org

 

 

 

Posted in Chinese, Ink, Installation, New Media, Video | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »