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Posts Tagged ‘Wang Tiande’

Is ink the next thing? Evidence mounts of growing interest in Chinese ink painting – Redbox

Posted by artradar on April 27, 2009


 

 

Wenda Gu, Ink not Ink at Drexel Uni, US

Wenda Gu, Ink not Ink at Drexel Uni, US

CHINESE INK

 

 

 

The international debut of contemporary ink painting from China already follows the wake of enthusiasm for Chinese contemporary art says the must-read Beijing-based Chinese art news site Redbox.

Wenda Gu, untitled installation, multi-racial human hair 1994-5

Wenda Gu, untitled installation, multi-racial human hair 1994-5

Speculations of an energetic revival of ink painting have been up in the air, and it is certainly not an coincidence that these prestigious museums all set foot in the creation of dialogues between Chinese and overseas scholars on the topic of contemporary Chinese ink painting.

Redbox notes the following current and upcoming exhibitions and alliances. 

  • “‘Ink not Ink”  – a traveling survey exhibition of 80 works in various media by 40 artists aims to show Chinese artists continuing exploration of Chinese traditional ink painting in a contemporary context. The show featuring Wenda Gu premiered in  Shenzhen art museum in South China and then went to Today Art Museum in Beijing before going to the Drexel University in the US . It is planned to take the show on to Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic.

See installation of Wendu Gu work in Ink not Ink exhibition on video

See interview with Wenda Gu on video

See gallery of Ink not Ink images by following artists: Wenda Gu, Wei Qingji, Wang Jiawei, Yan Yinhong, Lin Tianmiao, Yang Guoxin, Peng Wei, Dai Guangyu, Wang Tiande, Wei Qingje

Lin Tianmiao

Lin Tianmiao

  • the 2008 “The Transforming Marks of Ink” show in Berlin and Dresden, Germany (organized by the National Art Museum of China),

 

  • the strong focus on the ink medium in the current “Outside IN” exhibition at the Princeton University Museum of Art,

 

  • as well as the Cohen collection of works on paper in “Post-Mao Dreaming” at Smith College Museum

 

  • The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston has commissioned ten Chinese artists to create a work on paper inspired by a piece in the MFA collection, titled “Fresh Ink: Ten Takes on Chinese Tradition” slated for late 2010.

 

  • And following “Re-Boot: Third Chengdu Biennale” in 2007, which presented a gamut of contemporary works in all media that addressed the topic of guohua (national painting) or shuimo hua (ink painting), the Metropolitan Museum has consulted with esteemed curator and scholar Shen Kuiyi to organize a large group show for Spring 2011.

To explore this story further, click over to  Redbox which has produced a thorough list of links for the above list.

You can also find  more evidence of growing international interest in Chinese ink art in our related posts section below:

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Posted in Chinese, Installation, Museum shows, Videos | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

14 China rim artists show landscapes at opinion-leading Hong Kong gallery Hanart

Posted by artradar on February 9, 2009


Wucius Wong, Water Melody #5, Ink acrylic watercolour

Wucius Wong, Water Melody #5, Ink acrylic watercolour

Zheng Dianxing Moebius 2

Zheng Duanxiang Moebius 2

CHINESE LANDSCAPE SHOW

This show interests us because it points to the classic/contemporary trend in which we see a juxtaposition of  the historic and traditional with the new. Many contemporary Chinese artists are rediscovering the traditional medium of ink and using it in new ways or to depict contemporary concerns. In  this show we see ink used in this way but we also also see an interesting reversal, the classical quintessentially Chinese subject of landscapes is reinterpreted using modern media. The slow art trend – a backlash against fast-paced motion of new media – is here too and this show is a good place to get acquainted with some of the China rim (Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan) artists who are attracting growing interest.

Landscape Panorama

Hanart Gallery, Hong Kong 25 Feb to 31 March 2009

From the Press Release:

This exhibition features a variety of landscape images created by veteran artists from Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and Mainland China of diverse media including oil, ink, relief sculpture, lacquer and video works.

As veteran ink painter Wucius Wong has mentioned: “We can make use of this very nature to create a new approach to ink painting by seeking new directions that cut across cultures, across media, and across forms. The shifting paradigm in landscape painting is also seen among younger Chinese painters. For example, Qiu Anxiong has shifted from painting on canvas to classical Chinese ink medium. Feng Mengbo, now a leading figure in contemporary multi-media Chinese art moved the main crux of his creation to computer-generated video sequences. The line of these works, often criticizing the cynicism of computer games and aimed at utilizing their formal procedures, recently ended in a return to painting.

Participating artists:

Arnaldo Acconci
Feng Mengbo
Li Xubai
Leung Kui Ting
Liu Guosong
Lois Conner
Lucia Cheung
Qiu Anxiong
Qiu Shihua
Wang Tiande
Wang Tianliang
Wucius Wong
Yu Peng
Zheng Duanxiang

About Hanart

“This very tiny gallery (in the same building as American Express) has been exhibiting, promoting, and selling experimental art from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan since 1983. ” Frommer’s Review New York Times more

Sources: Hanart

Related categories: Ink, photography, reports from Hong Kong, Chinese artists

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